Demography

, Volume 55, Issue 2, pp 733–742 | Cite as

Socioeconomic Factors Have Been the Major Driving Force of China’s Fertility Changes Since the Mid-1990s

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Acknowledgments

The views expressed in this commentary are those of the authors, and do not necessarily represent those of the United Nations.

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Copyright information

© Population Association of America 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of DemographyAustralian National UniversityCanberraAustralia
  2. 2.United Nations Population DivisionNew YorkUSA

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