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Demography

, Volume 50, Issue 3, pp 1067–1091 | Cite as

How Do Tougher Immigration Measures Affect Unauthorized Immigrants?

  • Catalina Amuedo-Dorantes
  • Thitima Puttitanun
  • Ana P. Martinez-Donate
Article

Abstract

The recent impetus of tougher immigration-related measures passed at the state level raises concerns about the impact of such measures on the migration experience, trajectory, and future plans of unauthorized immigrants. In a recent and unique survey of Mexican unauthorized immigrants interviewed upon their voluntary return or deportation to Mexico, almost a third reported experiencing difficulties in obtaining social or government services, finding legal assistance, or obtaining health care services. Additionally, half of these unauthorized immigrants reported fearing deportation. When we assess how the enactment of punitive measures against unauthorized immigrants, such as E-Verify mandates, has affected their migration experience, we find no evidence of a statistically significant association between these measures and the difficulties reported by unauthorized immigrants in accessing a variety of services. However, the enactment of these mandates infuses deportation fear, reduces interstate mobility among voluntary returnees during their last migration spell, and helps curb deportees’ intent to return to the United States in the near future.

Keywords

Immigration Policy Undocumented Unauthorized Mexico 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This study was funded by the National Institute of Child and Human Development (Grant:1 R01HD046886-01A2).

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Copyright information

© Population Association of America 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Catalina Amuedo-Dorantes
    • 1
  • Thitima Puttitanun
    • 1
  • Ana P. Martinez-Donate
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of EconomicsSan Diego State UniversitySan DiegoUSA
  2. 2.Department of Population Health SciencesUniversity of Wisconsin–MadisonMadisonUSA

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