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Mathematics Education Research Journal

, Volume 31, Issue 4, pp 393–418 | Cite as

Perceptions on proof and the teaching of proof: a comparison across preservice secondary teachers in Australia, USA and Korea

  • Kristin Lesseig
  • Gregory HineEmail author
  • Gwi Soo Na
  • Kaleinani Boardman
Original Article

Abstract

Despite the recognised importance of mathematical proof in secondary education, there is a limited but growing body of literature indicating how preservice secondary mathematics teachers (PSMTs) view proof and the teaching of proof. The purpose of this survey research was to investigate how PSMTs in Australia, the USA and Korea perceive of proof in the context of secondary mathematics teaching and learning. PSMTs were able to outline various mathematical and pedagogical aspects of proof, including purposes, characteristics, reasons for teaching and imposed constraints. In addition, PSMTs attended to differing, though overlapping, features of proof when asked to determine the extent to which proposed arguments constituted proofs or to decide which arguments they might present to students.

Keywords

Reasoning and proof Preservice teacher education Mathematical knowledge for teaching High school education Secondary school education 

Notes

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Copyright information

© Mathematics Education Research Group of Australasia, Inc. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Education DepartmentWashington State University VancouverVancouverUSA
  2. 2.School of EducationThe University of Notre Dame AustraliaFremantleAustralia
  3. 3.Cheongju National University of EducationChungbukSouth Korea
  4. 4.Education DepartmentWashington State University VancouverVancouverUSA

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