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The Australian Educational Researcher

, Volume 41, Issue 4, pp 485–497 | Cite as

“Languages aren’t as important here”: German migrant teachers’ experiences in Australian language classes

  • Katharina Bense
Article

Abstract

Narrative studies with migrant teachers offer new perspectives on local educational practices and policies. As part of a study investigating German migrant teachers’ experiences in Australian language classes, this paper uses narratives to evaluate present language education strategies in Germany and Australia. It examines the provision and uptake of foreign languages as a subject area in the two countries and compares existing educational goals and arrangements regarding language education in Germany and Australia. The German migrant teachers’ accounts illustrate how current school policies and the value placed on language proficiency and multilingualism in the two countries’ education are impacting on learning and teaching in the language classroom. The findings have significant potential to inform and stimulate the evaluation of recent national initiatives in language education in Australia.

Keywords

Modern language education Narrative research German migrant teachers 

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Copyright information

© The Australian Association for Research in Education, Inc. 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.The University of Western AustraliaPerthAustralia

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