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Journal of NeuroVirology

, Volume 25, Issue 1, pp 133–136 | Cite as

Quantitative electroencephalography supports diagnosis of natalizumab-associated progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy

  • G. Classen
  • C. Classen
  • C. Bernasconi
  • C. Brandt
  • R. Gold
  • A. Chan
  • R. HoepnerEmail author
Case Report

Abstract

Long-term treatment of multiple sclerosis with natalizumab (NTZ) carries the risk of a devastating complication in the form of an encephalopathy caused by a reactivation of a latent John Cunningham virus infection (progressive multifocal leucoencephalopathy, PML). Early diagnosis is associated with considerably better prognosis. Quantitative EEG as an objective, rater-independent technique provides high sensitivity (88%) and specificity (82%) for the diagnosis of NTZ-PML. Combination of diagnostic modalities addressing static morphological (brain MRI) as well as functional (EEG) pathologic changes may improve risk management programmes.

Keywords

EEG Multiple sclerosis Natalizumab John Cunningham virus encephalopathy Screening Pharmacovigilance 

Notes

Acknowledgements

We like to thank F. Zubler, A. Salmen, S. Dahlhaus, R. Schneider, I. Kleiter and R. Schneider-Gold for their valuable contributions to this work.

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Copyright information

© Journal of NeuroVirology, Inc. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. Classen
    • 1
  • C. Classen
    • 2
  • C. Bernasconi
    • 3
  • C. Brandt
    • 4
  • R. Gold
    • 5
  • A. Chan
    • 5
    • 6
  • R. Hoepner
    • 5
    • 6
    Email author
  1. 1.Department of Paediatric NeurologyEvangelisches Klinikum BethelBielefeldGermany
  2. 2.Department of Computer ScienceTU Dortmund UniversityDortmundGermany
  3. 3.Clinical Trial Unit, Neurocentre BernBern University Hospital, University of BernBernSwitzerland
  4. 4.Department of General EpileptologyBethel Epilepsy CentreBielefeldGermany
  5. 5.Department of Neurology, St. Josef HospitalRuhr University BochumBochumGermany
  6. 6.Department of Neurology, InselspitalBern University Hospital, University of BernBernSwitzerland

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