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Journal of NeuroVirology

, Volume 25, Issue 1, pp 127–132 | Cite as

Vibrio vulnificus meningoencephalitis in a patient with thalassemia and a splenectomy

  • Rongni He
  • Wenxia Zheng
  • Jun Long
  • Yaowei Huang
  • Cuiping Liu
  • Qing Wang
  • Zhenxing Yan
  • Huayong Liu
  • Li Xing
  • Yafang HuEmail author
  • Huifang XieEmail author
Case Report
  • 79 Downloads

Abstract

Vibrio vulnificus usually causes wound infection, gastroenteritis, and septicemia. However, it is a rare conditional pathogen causing meningoencephalitis. We report a case of a young, immunocompromised man presenting with severe sepsis after exposure to sea water and consumption of seafood. The patient subsequently developed meningoencephalitis, and Vibrio vulnificus was isolated from his blood culture. The sequence was confirmed by Next-generation sequencing of a sample of cerebrospinal fluid, as well as from a bacteria culture. After the pathogen was detected, the patient was treated with ceftriaxone, doxycycline, and moxifloxacin for 6 weeks, which controlled his infection. In this case, we acquired his clinical and dynamic MRI presentations, which were never reported. Physicians should consider Vibrio vulnificus infections when they see a similar clinical course, brain CT and MRI findings, susceptibility factors and recent seafood ingestion or exposure to seawater. Due to high mortality, the early diagnosis and treatment of Vibrio vulnificus infections are crucial. Next-generation sequencing was found to be useful for diagnosis.

Keywords

Vibrio vulnificus meningoencephalitis Next-generation sequencing MRI presentations Clinical manifestations 

Abbreviations

WBC

white blood cell count

CSF

cerebrospinal fluid

NGS

next-generation sequencing

Notes

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflicts of interest.

Supplementary material

13365_2018_675_MOESM1_ESM.pdf (5.3 mb)
Supplementary Figure 1 (PDF 5425 kb)

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Copyright information

© Journal of NeuroVirology, Inc. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rongni He
    • 1
  • Wenxia Zheng
    • 1
  • Jun Long
    • 2
  • Yaowei Huang
    • 3
  • Cuiping Liu
    • 4
  • Qing Wang
    • 1
  • Zhenxing Yan
    • 1
  • Huayong Liu
    • 5
  • Li Xing
    • 5
  • Yafang Hu
    • 6
    Email author
  • Huifang Xie
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Department of Neurology, Zhujiang HospitalSouthern Medical UniversityGuangzhouChina
  2. 2.Division of Laboratory Medicine, Zhujiang HospitalSouthern Medical UniversityGuangzhouChina
  3. 3.The First School of Clinical MedicineSouthern Medical UniversityGuangzhouChina
  4. 4.Intensive Care Unit, Zhujiang HospitalSouthern Medical UniversityGuangzhouChina
  5. 5.Binhai Genomics Institute, BGI-ShenzhenShenzhenChina
  6. 6.Department of Neurology, Nanfang HospitalSouthern Medical UniversityGuangzhouChina

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