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Mammal Research

, Volume 60, Issue 2, pp 163–168 | Cite as

Long-distance dispersal of a wolf, Canis lupus, in northwestern Europe

  • Liselotte Wesley Andersen
  • Verena Harms
  • Romolo Caniglia
  • Sylwia D. Czarnomska
  • Elena Fabbri
  • Bogumiła Jędrzejewska
  • Gesa Kluth
  • Aksel Bo Madsen
  • Carsten Nowak
  • Cino Pertoldi
  • Ettore Randi
  • Ilka Reinhardt
  • Astrid Vik Stronen
Short Communication

Abstract

Several mammal species have recolonized their historical ranges across Europe during the last decades. In November 2012, a wolf-looking canid was found dead in Thy National Park (56° 56′ N, 8° 25′ E) in Jutland, Denmark. DNA from this individual and nine German wolves were genotyped using a genome-wide panel of 22,163 canine single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers and compared to existing profiles based on the same marker panel obtained from northeastern Polish (n = 13) wolves, domestic dogs (n = 13) and known wolf-dog hybrids (n = 4). The Thy canid was confirmed to be a wolf from the German-western Polish population, approximately 800 km to the southeast. Access to the German reference database on DNA profiles based on 13 autosomal microsatellites of German wolves made it possible to pinpoint the exact pack origin of the Thy wolf in Saxony, Germany. This was the first documented observation of a wolf in Denmark in 200 years and another example of long-distance dispersal of a carnivore.

Keywords

Large carnivores Long-distance dispersal Recolonization Principal component analysis Single nucleotide polymorphism Microsatellites 

Notes

Acknowledgments

We are grateful to all volunteers involved in sampling faecal samples and providing information on wolf sightings and behaviour in Germany and Poland. Microsatellite analyses of wolf samples from the Lausitz area were performed on behalf of the Sächsisches Staatsministerium für Umwelt und Landwirtschaft. We want to thank Marcin Górny, Mammal Research Institute Polish Academy of Science, Bialowieza, Poland for preparing the map. AROS Applied Biotechnology A/S, Aarhus, Denmark is gratefully acknowledged for granting and conducting the canid chip genotyping. CN was funded from the grant SAW-2011-SGN-3 from the Leibniz Association (Germany). AVS received support from the Danish Research Council, grant no. DFF—1337-00007. CP has been supported by the Danish Natural Science Research Council (grant number: #21-01-0526, #21-03-0125 and 95095995). This study was partly funded by BIOCONSUS (Research Potential in Conservation and Sustainable Management of Biodiversity, 7th Framework Programme contract no. 245737—AVS), the Polish Ministry of Science and Higher Education (grant no. NN 303 418437) and the Aalborg Zoo Conservation Foundation (AZCF).

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Copyright information

© Mammal Research Institute, Polish Academy of Sciences, Białowieża, Poland 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Liselotte Wesley Andersen
    • 1
  • Verena Harms
    • 2
  • Romolo Caniglia
    • 3
  • Sylwia D. Czarnomska
    • 4
  • Elena Fabbri
    • 3
  • Bogumiła Jędrzejewska
    • 4
  • Gesa Kluth
    • 5
  • Aksel Bo Madsen
    • 1
  • Carsten Nowak
    • 2
  • Cino Pertoldi
    • 6
    • 7
  • Ettore Randi
    • 3
    • 6
  • Ilka Reinhardt
    • 5
  • Astrid Vik Stronen
    • 6
  1. 1.Department of BioscienceAarhus UniversityRøndeDenmark
  2. 2.Senckenberg Research Institute and Natural History Museum FrankfurtGelnhausenGermany
  3. 3.Laboratorio di Genetica, ISPRAOzzano dell’Emilia (BO)Italy
  4. 4.Mammal Research Institute Polish Academy of ScienceBiałowieżaPoland
  5. 5.LUPUS – German Institute for Wolf Monitoring and ResearchSpreewitzGermany
  6. 6.Department of Chemistry and BioscienceAalborg UniversityAalborg ØstDenmark
  7. 7.Aalborg ZooAalborgDenmark

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