Swiss Journal of Palaeontology

, Volume 134, Issue 1, pp 5–43

Revised stratigraphy of Neogene strata in the Cocinetas Basin, La Guajira, Colombia

  • F. Moreno
  • A. J. W. Hendy
  • L. Quiroz
  • N. Hoyos
  • D. S. Jones
  • V. Zapata
  • S. Zapata
  • G. A. Ballen
  • E. Cadena
  • A. L. Cárdenas
  • J. D. Carrillo-Briceño
  • J. D. Carrillo
  • D. Delgado-Sierra
  • J. Escobar
  • J. I. Martínez
  • C. Martínez
  • C. Montes
  • J. Moreno
  • N. Pérez
  • R. Sánchez
  • C. Suárez
  • M. C. Vallejo-Pareja
  • C. Jaramillo
Article

Abstract

The Cocinetas Basin of Colombia provides a valuable window into the geological and paleontological history of northern South America during the Neogene. Two major findings provide new insights into the Neogene history of this Cocinetas Basin: (1) a formal re-description of the Jimol and Castilletes formations, including a revised contact; and (2) the description of a new lithostratigraphic unit, the Ware Formation (Late Pliocene). We conducted extensive fieldwork to develop a basin-scale stratigraphy, made exhaustive paleontological collections, and performed 87Sr/86Sr geochronology to document the transition from the fully marine environment of the Jimol Formation (ca. 17.9–16.7 Ma) to the fluvio-deltaic environment of the Castilletes (ca. 16.7–14.2 Ma) and Ware (ca. 3.5–2.8 Ma) formations. We also describe evidence for short-term periodic changes in depositional environments in the Jimol and Castilletes formations. The marine invertebrate fauna of the Jimol and Castilletes formations are among the richest yet recorded from Colombia during the Neogene. The Castilletes and Ware formations have also yielded diverse and biogeographically significant fossil vertebrate assemblages. The revised lithostratigraphy and chronostratigraphy presented here provides the necessary background information to explore the complete evolutionary and biogeographic significance of the excellent fossil record of the Cocinetas Basin.

Keywords

Stratigraphy Paleontology Paleoenvironments GABI (Great American Biotic Interchange) Miocene Pliocene Cocinetas Basin La Guajira Peninsula Colombia 

Supplementary material

13358_2015_71_MOESM1_ESM.pdf (1.9 mb)
Supplementary material 1 Correlation of the 26 stratigraphic sections measured and described in the Cocinetas basin. The figure also includes a composite section for the Basin (PDF 1899 kb)
13358_2015_71_MOESM2_ESM.xls (50 kb)
Supplementary material 2 Fossils and fossiliferous localities found in the Cocinetas basin (XLS 49 kb)

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Copyright information

© Akademie der Naturwissenschaften Schweiz (SCNAT) 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • F. Moreno
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • A. J. W. Hendy
    • 4
    • 5
  • L. Quiroz
    • 1
    • 6
  • N. Hoyos
    • 2
    • 1
    • 7
  • D. S. Jones
    • 5
  • V. Zapata
    • 1
    • 8
  • S. Zapata
    • 1
  • G. A. Ballen
    • 1
  • E. Cadena
    • 1
    • 9
  • A. L. Cárdenas
    • 1
    • 2
    • 7
  • J. D. Carrillo-Briceño
    • 1
    • 10
  • J. D. Carrillo
    • 1
    • 10
  • D. Delgado-Sierra
    • 11
  • J. Escobar
    • 1
    • 7
  • J. I. Martínez
    • 11
  • C. Martínez
    • 1
    • 12
  • C. Montes
    • 13
  • J. Moreno
    • 1
    • 14
  • N. Pérez
    • 1
    • 13
  • R. Sánchez
    • 1
  • C. Suárez
    • 1
    • 15
  • M. C. Vallejo-Pareja
    • 1
  • C. Jaramillo
    • 1
  1. 1.Smithsonian Tropical Research InstitutePanamáUSA
  2. 2.Corporación Geológica ARESBogotáColombia
  3. 3.University of RochesterRochesterUSA
  4. 4.Natural History Museum of Los Angeles CountyLos AngelesUSA
  5. 5.Florida Museum of Natural HistoryGainesvilleUSA
  6. 6.University of SaskatchewanSaskatoonCanada
  7. 7.Universidad del NorteBarranquillaColombia
  8. 8.Ecopetrol S.A.BogotáColombia
  9. 9.Senckenberg MuseumFrankfurtGermany
  10. 10.Paleontological Institute and MuseumUniversity of ZurichZurichSwitzerland
  11. 11.Universidad EafitMedellínColombia
  12. 12.Cornell UniversityIthacaUSA
  13. 13.Universidad de los AndesBogotáColombia
  14. 14.University of Nebraska-LincolnLincolnUSA
  15. 15.Museo de la PlataLa PlataArgentina

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