Swiss Journal of Palaeontology

, Volume 130, Issue 2, pp 203–216 | Cite as

A new genus and species of surgeon fish (Perciformes, Acanthuridae) from the Oligocene of Kanton Glarus, Switzerland

Article

Abstract

The new genus and species of surgeon fish, Glarithurus friedmani (Acanthuridae), from the Lower Oligocene (Rupelian) of Kanton Glarus, Switzerland, differs from all other acanthurid fishes, fossil and extant, by having a single anal-fin basal pterygiophore situated in the first interhaemal space, versus two or more such pterygiophores in all other taxa. The new taxon is based upon a 29-mm SL acronurus stage specimen that probably had already settled onto a benthic substrate from its pelagic larval stage and begun its transformation into a juvenile. It has a scalpel-like dermal spine on the caudal peduncle and a crest on the hyomandibular, which are derived characters that establish it as a member of the clade of higher acanthurins. Within that clade, it is unique because of the great depth of its basipterygium at the subpelvic keel.

Keywords

Acanthuridae Glarithurus friedmani Scalpel scale Acronurus Oligocene Kanton Glarus 

Notes

Acknowledgments

We thank Matt Friedman (University of Oxford) for calling our attention to the specimen that is the focus of the present contribution. Florian Witzmann (Museum für Naturkunde at Humboldt-University Berlin) kindly permitted our initial investigation of the specimen in the Berlin collection and its subsequent loan to us in Darmstadt and Washington; he also provided us with useful information. Markus Brinkmann (Museum für Naturkunde at Humboldt-University Berlin) skillful conducted the detailed airbrasive preparation of the specimen. Eric Milsom (Hessisches Landesmuseum Darmstadt) carefully mended fractures in the specimen when it was in danger of breaking and then consolidated the slab on a layer of polyester resin. Antje Röber (Darmstadt) prepared the stippled original drawings of the holotypic part and the detail of the caudal fin supports. We appreciate the generosity of Jean Gaudant (17, rue du Docteur Magnan, Paris) for providing us with information on the acronurus materials he had studied from the Miocene of Egypt and Greece. We thank G. David Johnson (National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, Washington) for making available to us his extensive collection of cleared and counter-stained early life history stages of extant acanthurids, including many acronurus stages. Sandra Raredon (National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, Washington) expertly prepared many radiographs of acronurus stage acanthurids for our use. Our several draft manuscripts leading to this publication benefited from the editing of Diane M. Tyler (Silver Spring, Maryland). Two anonymous reviewers provided useful comments.

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Copyright information

© Akademie der Naturwissenschaften Schweiz (SCNAT) 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian InstitutionWashington, DCUSA
  2. 2.Natural History DepartmentHessisches Landesmuseum DarmstadtDarmstadtGermany

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