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Applied Entomology and Zoology

, Volume 54, Issue 4, pp 481–486 | Cite as

A simple method using a folded structure for small-scale rearing of a phytoseiid mite, Gynaeseius liturivorus (Acari: Phytoseiidae), on eggs of Ephestia kuehniella (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae)

  • Hiroshi OidaEmail author
Technical Note
  • 143 Downloads

Abstract

This paper describes a technique for small-scale rearing of a phytoseiid mite, Gynaeseius liturivorus (Ehara) (Acari: Phytoseiidae), to facilitate studies on the use of this predator in the biological control of pest insects. The rearing arena consists of a Parafilm floor and concertina-folded roof. At 4 days after the introduction of 20 adults at 25 °C, most adults and immatures colonized the folded roof, and 60% of eggs were laid on it. Many individuals favored the underside. At 5–9 days, about 80–90 individuals were present, and at 14 days, 125 individuals and 105 eggs were present. Most newly hatched immatures climbed to the underside of the roof, where emerged adults also sheltered. Individuals can be easily separated from the smooth Parafilm at any developmental stage on a fine-point brush. The results show that an artificial arena with a folded Parafilm roof is suitable for rearing G. liturivorus. The method may also be suitable for use in risk assessment of chemical pesticides with G. liturivorus.

Keywords

Phytoseiid Rearing method Folded structure Development Oviposition 

Notes

Acknowledgements

I sincerely thank Zenta Nakai for providing the Togane strain of G. liturivorus.

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Copyright information

© The Japanese Society of Applied Entomology and Zoology 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Chiba Prefectural Agriculture and Forestry Research CenterMidoriJapan

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