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Applied Entomology and Zoology

, Volume 47, Issue 4, pp 379–388 | Cite as

Prediction of overseas migration of the small brown planthopper, Laodelphax striatellus (Hemiptera: Delphacidae) in East Asia

  • Akira OtukaEmail author
  • Yijun Zhou
  • Gwan-Seok Lee
  • Masaya Matsumura
  • Yeqin Zhu
  • Hong-Hyun Park
  • Zewen Liu
  • Sachiyo Sanada-Morimura
Original Research Paper

Abstract

A method has been developed for predicting the overseas migration of Laodelphax striatellus (Fallén) from eastern China to Japan and Korea. The method consists of two techniques: estimation of the emigration period in the source region and simulation of migration. The emigration period was estimated by calculating the effective accumulated temperature for the insect by use of real-time daily surface temperatures at the source. During the emigration period, migration simulations were performed twice a day, at every dusk and dawn. The prediction method was evaluated, by cross-validation using migrations in the 4 years from 2008 to 2011. The results showed that the emigration periods included the mass migrations, and that the method successfully predicted those migrations.

Keywords

Laodelphax striatellus Long-distance migration Effective accumulated temperature Migration simulation 

Notes

Acknowledgment

We thank Dr Gu-Feng Zhang for net trap monitoring of the small brown planthopper at Tongzhou Plant Protection Station, Jiangsu province, China. Mr Jeong Tae-Woo at Taean Agricultural Development and Technology Center, Chungnam province, Korea is also acknowledged for net trap monitoring of the insect.

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Copyright information

© The Japanese Society of Applied Entomology and Zoology 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Akira Otuka
    • 1
    Email author
  • Yijun Zhou
    • 2
  • Gwan-Seok Lee
    • 5
  • Masaya Matsumura
    • 1
  • Yeqin Zhu
    • 3
  • Hong-Hyun Park
    • 5
  • Zewen Liu
    • 4
  • Sachiyo Sanada-Morimura
    • 1
  1. 1.NARO/Kyushu Okinawa Agricultural Research CenterKumamotoJapan
  2. 2.Institute of Plant ProtectionJiangsu Academy of Agricultural SciencesNanjingPeople’s Republic of China
  3. 3.Plant Protection Station of Jiangsu ProvinceNanjingPeople’s Republic of China
  4. 4.College of Plant ProtectionNanjing Agricultural UniversityNanjingPeople’s Republic of China
  5. 5.Crop Protection DivisionNational Academy of Agricultural Science, Rural Development AdministrationSuwonRepublic of Korea

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