Journal of Civil Structural Health Monitoring

, Volume 3, Issue 3, pp 207–223 | Cite as

Assessment of vibration-based damage identification techniques using localized excitation source

  • Sherif Beskhyroun
  • Toshiyuki Oshima
  • Shuichi Mikami
  • Yasunori Miyamori
Article

Abstract

The Bridge Engineering Laboratory in Kitami Institute of Technology, Japan has introduced a number of different damage identification techniques to detect structural damage and identify its location utilizing piezoelectric actuators as a localized excitation source. Several spectral functions, such as cross spectral density, power spectral density, phase angle and transfer function estimate, were used to estimate the dynamic response of the structure. Each function’s magnitude, measured in a specified frequency range, is used in the damage identification methods. The change of the spectral function magnitude between the baseline state and the current state is then used to identify the location of possible damage in the structure. It is then necessary to determine which spectral function is best able to estimate the dynamic response and which algorithm is best able to identify the damage. The first part of this paper compares the performance of different spectral functions when their magnitude is used in one damage identification algorithm using experimental data from a railway steel bridge. The second part of this paper compares the performance of different damage identification algorithms using the same data.

Keywords

Damage detection Modal parameters Vibration data Health monitoring 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sherif Beskhyroun
    • 1
  • Toshiyuki Oshima
    • 2
  • Shuichi Mikami
    • 2
  • Yasunori Miyamori
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Faculty of EngineeringThe University of AucklandAucklandNew Zealand
  2. 2.Civil Engineering DepartmentKitami Institute of TechnologyKitamiJapan

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