Photonic Sensors

, Volume 2, Issue 4, pp 315–330 | Cite as

Fiber optic intensity-modulated sensors: a review in biomechanics

  • Paulo Roriz
  • António Ramos
  • José L. Santos
  • José A. Simões
Open Access
Review

Abstract

Fiber optic sensors have a set of properties that make them very attractive in biomechanics. However, they remain unknown to many who work in the field. Some possible causes are scarce information, few research groups using them in a routine basis, and even fewer companies offering turnkey and affordable solutions. Nevertheless, as optical fibers revolutionize the way of carrying data in telecommunications, a similar trend is detectable in the world of sensing. The present review aims to describe the most relevant contributions of fiber sensing in biomechanics since their introduction, from 1960s to the present, focusing on intensity-based configurations. An effort has been made to identify key researchers, research and development (R&D) groups and main applications.

Keywords

Biomechanics fiber optic sensors intensity-modulated sensors 

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This article is published under license to BioMed Central Ltd. Open Access This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits any use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author(s) and source are credited.

Authors and Affiliations

  • Paulo Roriz
    • 1
  • António Ramos
    • 1
  • José L. Santos
    • 2
  • José A. Simões
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of MechanicsUniversity of AveiroAveiroPortugal
  2. 2.Faculty of SciencesUniversity of PortoPortoPortugal

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