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Outbreak of angular leaf spot, caused by Xanthomonas fragariae, in a Queensland strawberry germplasm collection

  • Anthony J. Young
  • Thomas S. Marney
  • Mark Herrington
  • Don Hutton
  • Apollo O. Gomez
  • Adam Villiers
  • Paul R. Campbell
  • Andrew D. W. Geering
Article

Abstract

Strawberry (Fragaria (×) ananassa) plants exhibiting leaf lesions consistent with angular leaf spot (ALS, caused by Xanthomonas fragariae Kennedy and King 1962) were identified in the Queensland strawberry germplasm at Bundeberg in May 2010. Water suspensions of bacterial ooze tested positive using a previously described primer set. However, the slow growth rate of X. fragariae and the presence of a fast-growing, non-pathogenic, undescribed Xanthomonas species presented problems that were overcome by dilution plating and DNA sequence analysis. Sequencing of the gyrB locus of putative colonies of X. fragariae indicated 100% sequence similarity to other X. fragariae isolates. A new set of diagnostic primers for X. fragariae based on the gyrB locus is presented.

Keywords

Diagnostic PCR gyrB locus Cultural properties 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The authors wish to acknowledge Biosecurity Queensland for operational funding and Dr. Suzy Perry for logistical support, Dr. Jo Luck and Ramez Aldaoud (Victoria DPI) for discussion, Dr. Michael Priest (NSW I&I, Orange), for supplying deactivated cultures of the previous Australian incursions, as well as Natalia Peres and Teresa Seijo (University of Florida, USA), for supplying reference DNA for comparative purposes. We would also like to thank Stephanie Villiers and Julie Harris for critically reviewing the manuscript.

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Copyright information

© Australasian Plant Pathology Society Inc. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Anthony J. Young
    • 1
  • Thomas S. Marney
    • 1
  • Mark Herrington
    • 2
  • Don Hutton
    • 2
  • Apollo O. Gomez
    • 2
  • Adam Villiers
    • 3
  • Paul R. Campbell
    • 1
  • Andrew D. W. Geering
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of Employment, Economic Development and Innovation (DEEDI)Plant Pathology, Agri-SciencesBrisbaneAustralia
  2. 2.DEEDIMaroochy Research StationNambourAustralia
  3. 3.AshbyAustralia
  4. 4.Queensland Alliance for Agriculture and Food InnovationThe University of QueenslandDutton ParkAustralia

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