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Indian Pediatrics

, Volume 56, Issue 1, pp 76–80 | Cite as

Correspondence

  • Devi DayalEmail author
  • Meenal Agarwal
  • B. Adhisivam
  • C. Venkatesh
  • Vimlesh Soni
  • Prateek Srivastav
  • K. H. Vaishali
  • Sakshi Sachdeva
  • Rhishikesh Thakre
  • P. S. Patil
Article
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Copyright information

© Indian Academy of Pediatrics 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Devi Dayal
    • 1
    • 5
    Email author
  • Meenal Agarwal
    • 2
  • B. Adhisivam
    • 3
  • C. Venkatesh
    • 4
  • Vimlesh Soni
    • 5
  • Prateek Srivastav
    • 6
  • K. H. Vaishali
    • 6
  • Sakshi Sachdeva
    • 7
  • Rhishikesh Thakre
    • 8
  • P. S. Patil
    • 8
  1. 1.Endocrinology and Diabetes Unit, Department of Pediatrics, Advanced Pediatrics CenterPGIMERChandigarhIndia
  2. 2.Clinical Genetics, GenePathDxCauseway Healthcare Private LimitedPuneIndia
  3. 3.Department of NeonatologyJIPMERPuducherryIndia
  4. 4.Department of PediatricsJIPMERPuducherryIndia
  5. 5.Endocrinology and Diabetes Unit, Department of Pediatrics, Advanced Pediatrics CenterPGIMERChandigarhIndia
  6. 6.Department of Physiotherapy, School of Allied Health SciencesManipal Academy of Higher EducationManipalIndia
  7. 7.Pediatric Cardiology, Department of Cardiology, Cardio Neuro Center (CNC)AIIMSNew DelhiIndia
  8. 8.Neo Clinic and HospitalAurangabadIndia

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