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Indian Pediatrics

, Volume 55, Issue 6, pp 495–506 | Cite as

‘Ayushman Bharat’ Program and Universal Health Coverage in India

  • Chandrakant LahariyaEmail author
Special Article

Abstract

India’s National Health Policy 2017 (NHP-2017) has its goal fully aligned with the concept of Universal health coverage. The Ayushman Bharat Program announced in the Union budget 2018–19 of the Government of India, aims to carry NHP-2017 proposals forward. The Ayushman Bharat Program has two initiatives/components – Health and Wellness Centers, and National Health Protection Scheme – aiming for increased accessibility, availability and affordability of primary-, secondary- and tertiary-care health services in India. Afterwards, the second component has been renamed as Pradhan Mantri Rashtriya Swasthya Suraksha Mission. The new program has received an unprecedented public, political and media attention; and is being attributed to have placed health higher on political agenda. This review article analyzes and provides critical reflections, suggestions and way forward for rapid and effective implementation of Ayushman Bharat Program. To be effective and impactful in achieving the desired health outcomes, there is a need for getting both design and implementation of Ayushman Bharat Program right, from the very beginning. If implemented fully and supplemented with additional interventions, the program can prove a potential platform to reform Indian healthcare system and to accelerate India’s journey towards universal health coverage.

Keywords

Health insurance Health policy Primary healthcare Sustainable development goals Universal health coverage 

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Copyright information

© Indian Academy of Pediatrics 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.National Professional Officer – Universal Health CoverageWorld Health OrganizationNew DelhiIndia
  2. 2.New DelhiIndia

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