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Indian Pediatrics

, Volume 51, Issue 7, pp 539–543 | Cite as

INCLEN diagnostic tool for epilepsy (INDT-EPI) for primary care physicians: Development and validation

  • Ramesh Konanki
  • Devendra Mishra
  • Sheffali Gulati
  • Satinder Aneja
  • Vaishali Deshmukh
  • Donald Silberberg
  • Jennifer M. Pinto
  • Maureen Durkin
  • Ravindra M. Pandey
  • M. K. C. Nair
  • Narendra K. AroraEmail author
  • INCLEN Study Group
Research Paper

Abstract

Objective

To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of a new diagnostic instrument for epilepsy — INCLEN Diagnostic Tool for Epilepsy (INDT-EPI) — with evaluation by expert pediatric neurologists.

Study design

Evaluation of diagnostic test.

Setting

Tertiary care pediatric referral centers in India.

Methods

Children aged 2–9 years, enrolled by systematic random sampling at pediatric neurology out-patient clinics of three tertiary care centers were independently evaluated in a blinded manner by primary care physicians trained to administer the test, and by teams of two pediatric neurologists.

Outcomes

A 13-item questionnaire administered by trained primary care physicians (candidate test) and comprehensive subject evaluation by pediatric neurologists (gold standard).

Results

There were 240 children with epilepsy and 274 without epilepsy. The candidate test for epilepsy had sensitivity and specificity of 85.8% and 95.3%; positive and negative predictive values of 94.0% and 88.5%; and positive and negative likelihood ratios of 18.25 and 0.15, respectively.

Conclusion

The INDT-EPI has high validity to identify children with epilepsy when used by primary care physicians.

Keywords

Childhood neuro-developmental disorders Resource-limited settings Psychometric evaluations 

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Copyright information

© Indian Academy of Pediatrics 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ramesh Konanki
    • 1
  • Devendra Mishra
    • 1
  • Sheffali Gulati
    • 1
  • Satinder Aneja
    • 1
  • Vaishali Deshmukh
    • 1
  • Donald Silberberg
    • 1
  • Jennifer M. Pinto
    • 1
  • Maureen Durkin
    • 1
  • Ravindra M. Pandey
    • 1
  • M. K. C. Nair
    • 1
  • Narendra K. Arora
    • 1
    Email author
  • INCLEN Study Group
    • 1
  1. 1.INCLEN Trust InternationalNew DelhiIndia

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