Indian Pediatrics

, Volume 49, Issue 7, pp 569–571 | Cite as

A unique human rotavirus (non vaccine) G9P4 genotype infection in a child with gastroenteritis

  • V. Mangayarkarasi
  • A. Prema
  • P. Gunasekaran
  • B. V. Suresh Babu
  • K. Kaveri
Research Brief

Abstract

Group A Rotaviruses with serotypes G1–G4 and G9 are the common Rotavirus types of clinical importance. This study aimed at determining the different Rotavirus genotypes in stool sample of children below 5 years. A total of 300 children with acute gastroenteritis were tested for group specific VP6 antigen of group A Rotaviruses by Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay. 47 of these samples were positive for Rotavirus antigen. Out of these, 20 positive samples were subjected to Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction for genotyping. The identified genotypes were G9P8, G1P8, G2P4, G9P4 (non-vaccine genotype), G1P6, and G1 (P types not identified in 5 samples).

Key words

Genotypes Rotavirus Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR) 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Parashar UD, Bresee JS, Gentsch JR, Glass RI. Rotavirus. Emerg Infect Dis. 1998;4:561–570.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Kim JS, Kanf JO, Cho SC, Jang YT, Min SA, Park TH, et al. Epidemiological profile of rotavirus infection in the Republic of Korea: Results from prospective surveillance in the Jeongeub District, 1 July 2002 through 30 June 2004. J Infect Dis. 2005;192:S49–S56.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Fang ZY, Wang B, Kilgore PE, Bresee JS, Zhang LJ, Sun LW, et al. Sentinel hospital surveillance for rotavirus diarrhea in the Peoples Republic of China, Aug 2001–Jul 2003. J Infect Dis. 2005;192:S94–S99.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Hoshino Y, Jones RW, Ross J, Honma S, Santos N, Gentsch JR, et al. Rotavirus serotype G9 trains belonging to VP7 gene phylogenetic sequence lineage 1 may be more suitable for serotype G9 vaccine candidates than those belonging to lineage 2 or 3. J Virol. 2004;78:7795–7802.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Iturriza Gomara M, Green J, Brown DWG, et al. Seroepidemiological and molecular surveillance of human Rotavirus infections in the UK. London: Public Health Laboratory Service; 2000.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Gentsch JR, Laird AR, Beilfelt B, Griffin DD, Banyai K, Ramchandran M, et al. Serotype diversity and reassortment between human and animal rotavirus strains: Implications for rotavirus vaccine programs. J Infect Dis. 2005; 192:S146–S159.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Gouvea V, Glass RI, Woods P, Taniguchi K, Clark HF, Forrester B, et al. Polymerase chain reaction amplification and typing of rotavirus nucleic acid from stool specimens. J Clinic Microbiol. 1990;28: 276–282.Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Bahl R, Ray P, Subodh S, Shambharkar P, Saxena M, Parashar U, et al. Incidents of severe of rotavirus diarrhea in New Delhi, India, and G and P types of the infecting rotavirus strains. J Infect Dis. 2005;192:S114–S119.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Brown DWG, Mathan MM, Mathew M, Martin R, Beards GM, Mathan VI. Rotavirus epidemiology in Vellore, South India: Group, subgroup, serotype and electrophore type. J Clinic Microbiol. 1988;26:2410–2414.Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Ruiz-Palacios GM, Perez-Schael I, Velazquez FR, Abate H, Breue T, Clemens SA, et al. Safety and efficacy of an attenuated vaccine against severe gastroenteritis. N Engl J Med. 2006;354:11–22.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Indian Academy of Pediatrics 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • V. Mangayarkarasi
    • 1
    • 3
  • A. Prema
    • 1
  • P. Gunasekaran
    • 2
  • B. V. Suresh Babu
    • 2
  • K. Kaveri
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PediatricsSRM MCH & RCChennaiIndia
  2. 2.Department of VirologyKing Institute of Preventive Medicine and ResearchGuindy, ChennaiIndia
  3. 3.SRM MCH & RCChennaiIndia

Personalised recommendations