Indian Pediatrics

, Volume 47, Issue 12, pp 1055–1057 | Cite as

Management of asymptomatic or incidental Meckel’s diverticulum

  • Ayşe Karaman
  • Íbrahím Karaman
  • Yusuf Hakan Çavuşoǧlu
  • Derya Erdoǧan
  • Mustafa Kemal Aslan
Short Communication

Abstract

This study was conducted to compare the clinicopathologic characteristics of incidentally found and symptomatic cases of Meckel’s diverticulum with the aim of arriving at a recommendation regarding the management of incidental cases. A retrospective chart review was performed over a period of 24 years. Incidental group had 52 patients and symptomatic group had 128 patients(71%). Obstruction (42.9%) was the most common presentation, followed by diverticulitis (41.4%). Gastrointestinal hemorrhage was found in 33.6% and was commonly associated with obstruction. If the diverticulum has umbilical connection, mesodiverticular band or heterogeneous on palpation, and if patient has no contraindication for diverticulectomy, we advocate prophylactic resection to avoid future life threating complications.

Key words

Children Intestinal obstruction Management Meckel’s diverticulum 

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Copyright information

© Indian Academy of Pediatrics 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ayşe Karaman
    • 1
    • 2
  • Íbrahím Karaman
    • 1
  • Yusuf Hakan Çavuşoǧlu
    • 1
  • Derya Erdoǧan
    • 1
  • Mustafa Kemal Aslan
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Pediatric SurgeryDr Sami Ulus Children’s HospitalAnkaraTurkey
  2. 2.Cebeci, AnkaraTurkey

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