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Ambio

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Correction to: Documenting lemming population change in the Arctic: Can we detect trends?

  • Dorothée EhrichEmail author
  • Niels M. Schmidt
  • Gilles Gauthier
  • Ray Alisauskas
  • Anders Angerbjörn
  • Karin Clark
  • Frauke Ecke
  • Nina E. Eide
  • Erik Framstad
  • Jay Frandsen
  • Alastair Franke
  • Olivier Gilg
  • Marie-Andrée Giroux
  • Heikki Henttonen
  • Birger Hörnfeldt
  • Rolf A. Ims
  • Gennadiy D. Kataev
  • Sergey P. Kharitonov
  • Siw T. Killengreen
  • Charles J. Krebs
  • Richard B. Lanctot
  • Nicolas Lecomte
  • Irina E. Menyushina
  • Douglas W. Morris
  • Guy Morrisson
  • Lauri Oksanen
  • Tarja Oksanen
  • Johan Olofsson
  • Ivan G. Pokrovsky
  • Igor Yu. Popov
  • Donald Reid
  • James D. Roth
  • Sarah T. Saalfeld
  • Gustaf Samelius
  • Benoit Sittler
  • Sergey M. Sleptsov
  • Paul A. Smith
  • Aleksandr A. Sokolov
  • Natalya A. Sokolova
  • Mikhail Y. Soloviev
  • Diana V. Solovyeva
Publisher Correction

Correction to: Ambio  https://doi.org/10.1007/s13280-019-01198-7

In the original published article, some of the symbols ( Open image in new window , Open image in new window , Open image in new window , Open image in new window , △, Open image in new window ) in figure 1 were modified incorrectly ( Open image in new window , Open image in new window , Open image in new window , Open image in new window , Open image in new window , Open image in new window ) during the typesetting and publication process. The correct version of Fig. 1 is provided in this correction.

Fig. 1

Maps showing the locations of lemming monitoring sites in (A) Circumpolar region and (B) Fennoscandia (delimited by the large grey square in panel A). Different shadings of green indicate the delimitations of bioclimatic subzones. The high Arctic, low Arctic and Subarctic are drawn according to CAFF (2013) and the Oroarctic, which is customarily pooled with the arctic tundra in global biome overviews and represents potential habitat for lemmings south of the Arctic proper, according to Virtanen et al. (2016). Numbers refer to the sites as listed in Table 1 and symbols indicate small rodent community composition. Time series of annual small rodent abundance estimates are presented for selected sites (graphs for the remaining sites are given in Fig S1). On the time series graphs, triangles represent lemmings (upwards and black for Lemmus, and downwards and white for Dicrostonyx), circles represent data not identified to species such as winter nests, qualitative indices or incidental observations, whereas grey squares represent voles (all species pooled). The colour of the y-axis indicates the data type: black refers to individuals caught per 100 trap-nights (6, 8, 41 and all Fennoscandia except 39), light blue to density in individuals per ha (13, 16, 17), green to winter nest density in nests per ha (11), orange to incidental observations (numbers seen per observer-day [1], or observer-hour [15]) and purple to qualitative indices (39, 44, 48, 49). Smoothed trend lines for the total abundance of lemmings are shown in light blue. 35H and 35 L refer to the highland and lowland series of Joatka (Table S3)

The original article has been corrected.

Notes

Copyright information

© Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dorothée Ehrich
    • 1
    Email author
  • Niels M. Schmidt
    • 2
  • Gilles Gauthier
    • 3
  • Ray Alisauskas
    • 4
  • Anders Angerbjörn
    • 5
  • Karin Clark
    • 6
  • Frauke Ecke
    • 7
  • Nina E. Eide
    • 8
  • Erik Framstad
    • 9
  • Jay Frandsen
    • 10
  • Alastair Franke
    • 11
  • Olivier Gilg
    • 12
    • 13
  • Marie-Andrée Giroux
    • 14
  • Heikki Henttonen
    • 15
  • Birger Hörnfeldt
    • 7
  • Rolf A. Ims
    • 1
  • Gennadiy D. Kataev
    • 16
  • Sergey P. Kharitonov
    • 17
  • Siw T. Killengreen
    • 1
  • Charles J. Krebs
    • 18
  • Richard B. Lanctot
    • 19
  • Nicolas Lecomte
    • 14
  • Irina E. Menyushina
    • 20
  • Douglas W. Morris
    • 21
  • Guy Morrisson
    • 22
  • Lauri Oksanen
    • 23
    • 24
  • Tarja Oksanen
    • 23
    • 24
  • Johan Olofsson
    • 25
  • Ivan G. Pokrovsky
    • 26
    • 27
    • 35
  • Igor Yu. Popov
    • 28
  • Donald Reid
    • 29
  • James D. Roth
    • 30
  • Sarah T. Saalfeld
    • 19
  • Gustaf Samelius
    • 31
  • Benoit Sittler
    • 32
  • Sergey M. Sleptsov
    • 33
  • Paul A. Smith
    • 34
  • Aleksandr A. Sokolov
    • 35
    • 36
  • Natalya A. Sokolova
    • 35
    • 36
  • Mikhail Y. Soloviev
    • 37
  • Diana V. Solovyeva
    • 27
  1. 1.UiT The Arctic University of NorwayTromsøNorway
  2. 2.Arctic Research Centre, Department of BioscienceAarhus UniversityRoskildeDenmark
  3. 3.Département de Biologie and Centre d’Études NordiquesUniversité LavalQuébecCanada
  4. 4.Wildlife Research DivisionEnvironment and Climate Change CanadaSaskatoonCanada
  5. 5.Department of ZoologyStockholm UniversityStockholmSweden
  6. 6.Environment and Natural ResourcesYellowknifeCanada
  7. 7.Department of Wildlife, Fish, and Environmental StudiesSwedish University of Agricultural SciencesUmeåSweden
  8. 8.Norwegian Institute for Nature ResearchTrondheimNorway
  9. 9.Norwegian Institute for Nature ResearchOsloNorway
  10. 10.Parks CanadaInuvikCanada
  11. 11.Department of Renewable ResourcesUniversity of AlbertaEdmontonCanada
  12. 12.UMR 6249 Chrono-Environnement, Université de Bourgogne Franche-ComtéBesançonFrance
  13. 13.Groupe de recherche en Ecologie ArctiqueFranchevilleFrance
  14. 14.K.-C.-Irving Research Chair in Environmental Sciences and Sustainable DevelopmentUniversité de MonctonMonctonCanada
  15. 15.Natural Resources Institute FinlandHelsinkiFinland
  16. 16.Laplandskii Nature ReserveMonchegorskRussia
  17. 17.Bird Ringing Centre of RussiaMoscowRussia
  18. 18.Department of ZoologyUniversity of British ColumbiaVancouverCanada
  19. 19.Migratory Bird Management DivisionU.S. Fish and Wildlife ServiceAnchorageUSA
  20. 20.MoscowRussia
  21. 21.Department of BiologyLakehead UniversityThunder BayCanada
  22. 22.National Wildlife Research Centre, Environment and Climate Change CanadaCarleton UniversityOttawaCanada
  23. 23.Department of Arctic and Marine BiologyUiT - The Arctic University of NorwayAltaNorway
  24. 24.Department of Biology, Section of EcologyUniversity of TurkuTurkuFinland
  25. 25.Department of Ecology and Environmental ScienceUmeå UniversityUmeåSweden
  26. 26.Max-Planck Institute for OrnithologyRadolfzellGermany
  27. 27.Laboratory of OrnithologyInstitute of Biological Problems of the NorthMagadanRussia
  28. 28.A.N. Severtsov Institute of Ecology and EvolutionRussian Academy of SciencesMoscowRussia
  29. 29.Wildlife Conservation Society CanadaWhitehorseCanada
  30. 30.Department of Biological SciencesUniversity of ManitobaWinnipegCanada
  31. 31.Snow Leopard TrustSeattleUSA
  32. 32.Chair for Nature Conservation and Landscape EcologyUniversity of FreiburgFreiburgGermany
  33. 33.Institute of Biological Problems of CryolithozoneSiberian Branch of the Russian Academy of SciencesYakutskRussia
  34. 34.National Wildlife Research CentreOttawaCanada
  35. 35.Arctic Research Station of Institute of Plant and Animal Ecology, Ural BranchRussian Academy of SciencesLabytnangiRussia
  36. 36.Science Center for Arctic StudiesState Organization of Yamal-Nenets Autonomous DistrictSalekhardRussia
  37. 37.Department of Vertebrate Zoology, Faculty of BiologyMoscow State UniversityMoscowRussia

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