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Tumor Biology

, Volume 37, Issue 9, pp 11973–11981 | Cite as

A convenient and effective strategy for the enrichment of tumor-initiating cell properties in prostate cancer cells

  • Yiming Zhang
  • Yiqiang Huang
  • Zhong Jin
  • Xiezhao Li
  • Bingkun Li
  • Peng Xu
  • Peng HuangEmail author
  • Chunxiao LiuEmail author
Original Article

Abstract

Stem-like prostate cancer (PrCa) cells, also called PrCa stem cells (PrCSCs) or PrCa tumor-initiating cells (PrTICs), are considered to be involved in the mediation of tumor metastasis and may be responsible for the poor prognosis of PrCa patients. Currently, the methods for PrTIC sorting are mainly based on cell surface marker or side population (SP). However, the rarity of these sorted cells limits the investigation of the molecular mechanisms and therapeutic strategies targeting PrTICs. For PrTIC enrichment, we induced cancer stem cell (CSC) properties in PrCa cells by transducing three defined factors (OCT3/4, SOX2, and KLF4), followed by culture with conventional serum-containing medium. The CSC properties in the transduced cells were evaluated by proliferation, cell cycle, SP assay, drug sensitivity technology, in vivo tumorigenicity, and molecular marker analysis of PrCSCs compared with parental cells and spheroids. After culture with serum-containing medium for 8 days, the PrCa cells transduced with the three factors showed significantly enhanced CSC properties in terms of marker gene expression, sphere formation, chemoresistance to docetaxel, and tumorigenicity. The percentage of CD133+/CD44+ cells was ninefold higher in the transduced cell population than in the adherent PC3 cell population (2.25 ± 0.62 vs. 0.25 ± 0.12 %, respectively), and the SP increased to 1.22 ± 0.18 % in the transduced cell population, but was undetectable in the adherent population. This method can be used to obtain abundant PrTIC material and enables a complete understanding of PrTIC biology and development of novel therapeutic agents targeting PrTICs.

Keywords

Tumor-initiating cells Enrichment Reprogramming Prostate cancer 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This study was supported by scientific research grants from the Pearl River Nova Program of Guangzhou (No. 2013J2200044), the National Natural Scientific Foundation of China (No. 81101559).

This work was supported by Grant [2013] 163 from Key Laboratory of Malignant Tumor Molecular Mechanism and Translational Medicine of Guangzhou Bureau of Science and Information Technology; Grant KLB09001 from the Key Laboratory of Malignant Tumor Gene Regulation and Target Therapy of Guangdong Higher Education Institutes.

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflicts of interest

None

Supplementary material

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Copyright information

© International Society of Oncology and BioMarkers (ISOBM) 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yiming Zhang
    • 1
  • Yiqiang Huang
    • 1
  • Zhong Jin
    • 1
  • Xiezhao Li
    • 1
  • Bingkun Li
    • 1
  • Peng Xu
    • 1
  • Peng Huang
    • 1
    Email author
  • Chunxiao Liu
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Department of Urology, Zhujiang HospitalSouthern Medical UniversityGuangzhouChina

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