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Tumor Biology

, Volume 35, Issue 8, pp 7693–7698 | Cite as

The expression of β-catenin in different subtypes of breast cancer and its clinical significance

  • Shuguang Li
  • Shanshan Li
  • Ying Sun
  • Li LiEmail author
Research Article

Abstract

The Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway is implicated in mammary oncogenesis. Reports of β-catenin expression and its association with outcome in breast cancer are controversial. This study was performed to address the distribution of β-catenin expression in invasive breast cancer and the correlation between β-catenin expression and survival of breast cancer patients, and to determine whether β-catenin was specifically activated in any molecular subtypes. Immunohistochemistry was performed on a tissue microarray containing 169 invasive breast cancers to detect expression of β-catenin. One hundred thirty one of the 169 patients were followed up. Correlation between β-catenin expression and different molecular subtypes was determined using chi-square analysis. Overall survival (OS) was analyzed by Kaplan-Meier method with log-rank test. The invasive breast cancer displayed the different patterns of β-catenin expression from normal tissues with significantly increased cytoplasmic and nuclear staining of β-catenin. Aberrant β-catenin expression was observed in 109 in the 169 cases (64.50 %), and there was no difference in β-catenin expression in the four molecular subtypes. Furthermore, aberrant β-catenin expression was significantly associated with adverse outcome not only in the entire cohort but also in each of the different molecular subtypes. β-catenin activation is preferentially found and is associated with a poor clinical outcome in invasive breast cancer independent of molecular subtype.

Keywords

Breast cancer β-catenin Molecular subtype Prognosis 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This study was supported by grants from the Shandong Province Science and Technology Development Projects (2013GSF11839) and Independent Innovation Foundation for Universities and Colleges in Jinan City (201311023).

Conflicts of interest

None.

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Copyright information

© International Society of Oncology and BioMarkers (ISOBM) 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Medical Oncology, Cancer CenterQilu Hospital of Shandong UniversityJinanChina
  2. 2.Department of OncologyDongguan Houjie Hospital affiliated to Guangdong Medical CollegeDongguanChina

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