Annals of Microbiology

, Volume 61, Issue 3, pp 655–662 | Cite as

Leaf chemistry and co-occurring species interactions affecting the endophytic fungal composition of Eupatorium adenophorum

  • Huan Jiang
  • Yun-Tao Shi
  • Zhen-Xin Zhou
  • Chen Yang
  • Yun-Jiao Chen
  • Li-Min Chen
  • Ming-Zhi Yang
  • Han-Bo Zhang
Original Article

Abstract

The endophytic fungal composition of healthy leaves from an invasive plant (Eupatorium adenophorum) in China was investigated. Six morphologically different endophytes were found to inhabit the leaves. Based on a phylogenetic analysis of the internal transcribed spacer sequences (ITS), four morphotypes were close to Alternaria, Cladosporium, Pestalotiopsis, and Didymella, respectively, while two morphotypes were close to unidentified fungi. The frequency at which the endophytes occurred varied among leaves, branches, and individuals, with species diversity markedly increasing with increasing leaf age. Chemical conditions alone did not adequately explain the lower degree of endophytic fungal diversity in younger leaves. Competition between endophytes mediated through non-volatile and volatile metabolites were common and may be a major factor accounting for the heterogeneous distribution of endophytes in leaves of E. adenophorum.

Keywords

Eupatorium adenophorum Invasive plant Foliar endophytes Interaction Leaf chemistry 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag and the University of Milan 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Huan Jiang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Yun-Tao Shi
    • 1
    • 2
  • Zhen-Xin Zhou
    • 1
    • 2
  • Chen Yang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Yun-Jiao Chen
    • 1
    • 2
  • Li-Min Chen
    • 2
  • Ming-Zhi Yang
    • 2
  • Han-Bo Zhang
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Laboratory of Conservation and Utilization for Bio-resources and Key Laboratory for Microbial Resources of the Ministry of EducationYunnan UniversityKunmingPeople’s Republic of China
  2. 2.School of Life ScienceYunnan UniversityKunmingPeople’s Republic of China

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