Advertisement

BioChip Journal

, Volume 7, Issue 4, pp 393–398 | Cite as

Innate immune response gene expression profiles in specific pathogen-free chickens infected with avian influenza virus subtype H9N2

  • Dong-Hun Lee
  • Seong-Su Yuk
  • Jae-Keun Park
  • Jung-Hoon Kwon
  • Tseren-Ochir Erdene-Ochir
  • Jin-Yong Noh
  • So Yeon Yu
  • Seung Yong Hwang
  • Sang-Won Lee
  • Chang-Seon SongEmail author
Original Article

Abstract

In poultry species, H9N2 low pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI) virus infections frequently lead to low to moderate mortality rates and morbidity characterized by depression, respiratory disease symptoms, and decreases in egg production. Since current knowledge on the avian immune response to H9N2 infection is limited, we used microarray analysis to examine global changes in immune-related gene expression induced by H9N2 LPAI infection in specific pathogen-free chickens. The expression profiles of approximately 800 genes, including those that influence cell differentiation, transcription, transport, immune responses, and signal transduction, were altered by H9N2 infection. A complete chicken genome microarray analysis identified a strong innate antiviral host response after infection in spleens. In particular, a significant number of immune response genes, including interferon genes and related immune response genes, were upregulated following H9N2 infection. The increased transcription of 2′-5′-oligoadenylate synthetase and myxovirus resistance genes was confirmed by real-time RT-PCR. These results suggest that the host response generated against H9N2 infection may contribute to protective effects by manipulating innate immune responses.

Keywords

Avian influenza virus H9N2 Microarray Innate immunity Interferon 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Alexander, D.J. An overview of the epidemiology of avian influenza. Vaccine 25, 5637–5644 (2007).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Peiris, M. et al. Human infection with influenza H9N2. Lancet 354, 916–917 (1999).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Lee, D.H. & Song, C.S. H9N2 avian influenza virus in Korea: evolution and vaccination. Clin. Exp. Vaccine Res. 2, 26–33 (2013).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Peiris, J.S., Cheung, C.Y., Leung, C.Y. & Nicholls, J.M. Innate immune responses to influenza A H5N1: friend or foe? Trends Immunol. 30, 574–584 (2009).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Kash, J.C. et al. Genomic analysis of increased host immune and cell death responses induced by 1918 influenza virus. Nature 443, 578–581 (2006).Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Us, D. Cytokine storm in avian influenza. Mikrobiyol. Bul. 42, 365–380 (2008).Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Cheung, C.Y. et al. Induction of proinflammatory cytokines in human macrophages by influenza A (H5N1) viruses: a mechanism for the unusual severity of human disease? Lancet 360, 1831–1837 (2002).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    de Jong, M.D. et al. Fatal outcome of human influenza A(H5N1) is associated with high viral load and hypercytokinemia. Nat. Med. 12, 1203–1207 (2006).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Reemers, S.S. et al. Early host responses to avian influenza A virus are prolonged and enhanced at transcriptional level depending on maturation of the immune system. Mol. Immunol. 47, 1675–1685 (2010).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Kwon, J.S. et al. Immune responses and pathogenesis in immunocompromised chickens in response to infection with the H9N2 low pathogenic avian influenza virus. Virus Res. 133, 187–194 (2008).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    Chakrabarti, A.K. et al. Host gene expression profiling in influenza A virus-infected lung epithelial (A549) cells: a comparative analysis between highly pathogenic and modified H5N1 viruses. Virol. J. 7, 219 (2010).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    Sarmento, L., Afonso, C.L., Estevez, C., Wasilenko, J. & Pantin-Jackwood, M. Differential host gene expression in cells infected with highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza viruses. Vet. Immunol. Immunopathol. 125, 291–302 (2008).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. 13.
    Darnell, J.E., Jr. STATs and gene regulation. Science 277, 1630–1635 (1997).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. 14.
    Alexopoulou, L., Holt, A.C., Medzhitov, R. & Flavell, R.A. Recognition of double-stranded RNA and activation of NF-kappaB by Toll-like receptor 3. Nature 413, 732–738 (2001).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. 15.
    Matulova, M. et al. Characterization of chicken spleen transcriptome after infection with Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis. PLoS One 7, e48101 (2012).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. 16.
    Rue, C.A. et al. Virulent Newcastle disease virus elicits a strong innate immune response in chickens. J. Gen. Virol. 92, 931–939 (2011).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. 17.
    Lee, Y.N. et al. Isolation and characterization of a novel H9N2 influenza virus in Korean native chicken farm. Avian Dis. 55, 724–727 (2011).CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© The Korean BioChip Society and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dong-Hun Lee
    • 1
  • Seong-Su Yuk
    • 1
  • Jae-Keun Park
    • 1
  • Jung-Hoon Kwon
    • 1
  • Tseren-Ochir Erdene-Ochir
    • 1
  • Jin-Yong Noh
    • 1
  • So Yeon Yu
    • 2
    • 3
  • Seung Yong Hwang
    • 2
    • 3
  • Sang-Won Lee
    • 1
  • Chang-Seon Song
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Avian Disease Laboratory, College of Veterinary MedicineKonkuk UniversitySeoulKorea
  2. 2.Department of BiochemistryHanyang UniversityGyeonggi-doKorea
  3. 3.GenoCheck Co. Ltd.SeoulKorea

Personalised recommendations