BioChip Journal

, Volume 6, Issue 4, pp 325–334 | Cite as

Development of DNA chip for verification of 25 microalgae collected from southern coastal region in Korea

  • Gunsup Lee
  • So Yun Park
  • Seungshic Yum
  • Seonock Woo
  • Youn-Ho Lee
  • Seung Yong Hwang
  • Heung-Sik Park
  • Sang Hyun Moh
  • Sukchan Lee
  • Taek-Kyun Lee
Original Research

Abstract

Countless species occur in the marine microalgal domain. Some are used as health functional foods or medical products but many species are harmful such as those that cause the red tide. Therefore, it is necessary to conduct prompt and accurate identification of microalgal species. As it is quite difficult to accurately distinguish all species in terms of morphology, we performed DNA barcoding analysis using molecular markers for more accurate and rapid screening. DNA barcoding analysis, i.e., DNA chip technology, is a powerful method for studies on microalgal taxonomy and biodiversity. We used the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (mtCOI) as a barcoding gene to identify microalgal species. In this study, the diversity and phylogenetic differences among different microalgae were analyzed. Additionally, a microalgal species-specific probe was screened by 21–23 bp and the result was printed on silylated slide for use in a robotic microarrayer. As a result, we performed a DNA chip assay for each of 25 microalgal species and determined that the COI barcode gene was suitable as a marker gene, as it could identify various microalgae from the Korean South Sea by species.

Keywords

Microalgae DNA barcoding Mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I DNA chip assay Marker gene 

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Copyright information

© The Korean BioChip Society and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gunsup Lee
    • 1
  • So Yun Park
    • 2
  • Seungshic Yum
    • 1
  • Seonock Woo
    • 1
  • Youn-Ho Lee
    • 3
  • Seung Yong Hwang
    • 4
  • Heung-Sik Park
    • 5
  • Sang Hyun Moh
    • 6
  • Sukchan Lee
    • 6
  • Taek-Kyun Lee
    • 1
  1. 1.South Sea Environment Research DepartmentKorea Institute of Ocean Science and TechnologyGeojeKorea
  2. 2.Medical Research Center of Neural DysfunctionGyeonsang National UniversityJinjuKorea
  3. 3.Marine Living Resources Research DepartmentKorea Institute of Ocean Science and TechnologyAnsan, Gyeonggi-doKorea
  4. 4.Department of BiochemistryHanyang University & GenoCheck Co. Ltd.Sangnok-gu, Ansan, Gyeonggi-doKorea
  5. 5.Korea South Pacific Ocean Research CenterKorea Institute of Ocean Science and TechnologyAnsan, Gyeonggi-doKorea
  6. 6.Department of Genetic EngineeringSungkyunkwan UniversitySuwonKorea

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