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3 Biotech

, 8:361 | Cite as

ADNCD: a compendious database on anti-diabetic natural compounds focusing on mechanism of action

  • Aisha Khatoon
  • Iliyas Rashid
  • Sibhghatulla Shaikh
  • Syed Mohd Danish Rizvi
  • Shazi Shakil
  • Neelam Pathak
  • Snober S. Mir
  • Khurshid Ahmad
  • Talib Hussain
  • Prachi Srivastava
Original Article
  • 45 Downloads

Abstract

Diabetes is a deteriorating metabolic ailment which negatively affects different organs; however, its prime target is insulin secreting pancreatic β-cells. Although, different medications have been affirmed for diabetes management and numerous drugs are undergoing clinical trials, no significant breakthrough has yet been achieved. Available drugs either show some side effects or provide only short-term alleviation. The rationales behind the failure of current anti-diabetic treatment strategy are association of complex patho-physiologies and participation of various organs. Consequently, there is a critical need to search for multi-effect drugs that might impede various patho-physiological mechanisms related to diabetes. Fortunately, one natural compound could act on several diabetes linked targets. Thus, natural compounds might be regarded as a viable alternative choice to improve the progression as well as side effects of diabetes. Despite the fact that immense literatures are available on natural compounds indicating promising outcomes against diabetes, more systematic studies are still needed to establish them as effective anti-diabetic agents. Till date, we are unable to access all the information regarding modes of action, toxicity risks and physicochemical properties of anti-diabetic natural compounds on one platform. Hence, anti-diabetic natural compounds database (ADNCD) has been created to categorize each anti-diabetic natural compound on the basis of their mode of action and to provide compendious information of their physicochemical properties and toxicity risks. In short, ADNCD has imperative information for the researchers working in the field of diabetes drug development.

Keywords

Diabetes Anti-diabetic drugs Pancreatic β-cells Anti-diabetic natural compounds Hyperglycaemia 

Notes

Acknowledgements

Aisha Khatoon is supported by Maulana Azad National Fellowship grant from UGC, New Delhi, India (Grant number: MANF-2014-15-MUS-UTT-36526). Sibhghatulla Shaikh is supported by INSPIRE grant from the Department of Science & Technology (DST), New Delhi, India (Grant number: IF130056), which is sincerely acknowledged. We would like to thank the developers of Mol inspiration property calculation tool and Osiris property explorer.

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

On behalf of all authors, the corresponding author states that there is no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Aisha Khatoon
    • 1
  • Iliyas Rashid
    • 2
  • Sibhghatulla Shaikh
    • 1
  • Syed Mohd Danish Rizvi
    • 3
  • Shazi Shakil
    • 4
    • 5
    • 6
  • Neelam Pathak
    • 1
  • Snober S. Mir
    • 7
  • Khurshid Ahmad
    • 8
  • Talib Hussain
    • 3
  • Prachi Srivastava
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of BiosciencesIntegral UniversityLucknowIndia
  2. 2.Amity Institute of BiotechnologyAmity UniversityLucknowIndia
  3. 3.Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, College of PharmacyUniversity of HailHailSaudi Arabia
  4. 4.Center of Innovation in Personalized MedicineKing Abdulaziz UniversityJeddahSaudi Arabia
  5. 5.Department of Medical Laboratory Technology, Faculty of Applied Medical SciencesKing Abdulaziz UniversityJeddahSaudi Arabia
  6. 6.Center of Excellence in Genomic Medicine ResearchKing Abdulaziz UniversityJeddahSaudi Arabia
  7. 7.Department of BioengineeringIntegral UniversityLucknowIndia
  8. 8.Department of Medical BiotechnologyYeungnam UniversityGyeongsanRepublic of Korea

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