Symbiosis

, Volume 51, Issue 1, pp 1–12 | Cite as

Symbiosis research, technology, and education: Proceedings of the 6th International Symbiosis Society Congress held in Madison Wisconsin, USA, August 2009

  • Heidi Goodrich-Blair
  • Jean-Michel Ané
  • James D. Bever
  • Seth R. Bordenstein
  • Monika Bright
  • John M. Chaston
  • Keith Clay
  • Cameron R. Currie
  • Angela E. Douglas
  • Nicole Gerardo
  • Maria J. Harrison
  • Ruth E. Ley
  • Margaret McFall-Ngai
  • Arijit Mukherjee
  • Bethany Rader
  • Kenneth F. Raffa
  • Edward G. Ruby
  • Mary Beth Saffo
  • Marc-André Selosse
  • Justin L. Sonnenburg
  • S. Patricia Stock
  • Garret Suen
  • Katarzyna Turnau
  • Michael Udvardi
  • Karen L. Visick
  • Virginia M. Weis
Article

Abstract

Symbiosis, the intimate association between two or more organisms, is a fundamental component of biological systems. Our ability to understand the processes involved in the establishment and function of Symbiosis has critical consequences for the health of humans and the world we live in. For example, a deeper understanding of how legumes and insects have harnessed the nitrogen-fixing capacity of microbes can pave the way toward novel strategies to decrease fertilizer use. Also, using insect models to elucidate links between diet, gut microbiota, and toxin sensitivity not only has implications for biological control strategies, but also will lend insights into similar links in the human gut ecosystem. These types of ideas were presented and discussed at the 6th International Symbiosis Society Congress held in Madison, Wisconsin August, 2009. Over 300 participants from 20 countries attended the 7-day event, which featured cutting-edge symbiosis research from many different perspectives and disciplines. The conference was organized thematically, with oral sessions focused on Evolution, Ecology, Metabolism, the Host-Microbe Interface, Threats to Earth Systems, Symbiosis Models and the Human Microbiome, Viruses and Organelles, and Symbiosis Education. World-renowned scientists, post-doctoral fellows, and students were given the opportunity to describe their most recent discoveries. Session chairs provided overviews of their programs which highlight how the comparative analysis of different systems reveal common trends underlying symbiotic associations, what tools and theory are being developed that may be applied more broadly in symbiosis research, how symbiosis research contributing solutions to global issues such as emerging antibiotic resistance, a need for alternative energy sources, the pursuit of sustainable agriculture and natural resources, and how symbiotic systems are ideal for educating people about the fascinating natural world around us. The following paragraphs provide an overview of the research and discussions that took place during the congress.

Keywords

Evolution Ecology Metabolic symbiosis Host-symbiont interface Human microbiome Symbiosis models Restoration ecology Viruses Organelles Education Career development 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Heidi Goodrich-Blair
    • 1
  • Jean-Michel Ané
    • 2
  • James D. Bever
    • 3
  • Seth R. Bordenstein
    • 4
  • Monika Bright
    • 5
  • John M. Chaston
    • 1
  • Keith Clay
    • 6
  • Cameron R. Currie
    • 1
  • Angela E. Douglas
    • 7
  • Nicole Gerardo
    • 8
  • Maria J. Harrison
    • 9
  • Ruth E. Ley
    • 10
  • Margaret McFall-Ngai
    • 11
  • Arijit Mukherjee
    • 2
    • 12
  • Bethany Rader
    • 11
  • Kenneth F. Raffa
    • 13
  • Edward G. Ruby
    • 11
  • Mary Beth Saffo
    • 14
  • Marc-André Selosse
    • 15
  • Justin L. Sonnenburg
    • 16
  • S. Patricia Stock
    • 17
  • Garret Suen
    • 1
  • Katarzyna Turnau
    • 18
  • Michael Udvardi
    • 19
  • Karen L. Visick
    • 20
  • Virginia M. Weis
    • 21
  1. 1.Department of BacteriologyUniversity of Wisconsin-MadisonMadisonUSA
  2. 2.Department of AgronomyUniversity of Wisconsin-MadisonMadisonUSA
  3. 3.Department of BiologyJordon Hall, Indiana UniversityBloomingtonUSA
  4. 4.Department of Biological SciencesVanderbilt UniversityNashvilleUSA
  5. 5.Department of Marine BiologyUniversity of ViennaViennaAustria
  6. 6.Department of BiologyIndiana UniversityBloomingtonUSA
  7. 7.Department of EntomologyCornell UniversityIthacaUSA
  8. 8.Department of Biology, O. Wayne Rollins Research CenterEmory UniversityAtlantaUSA
  9. 9.Boyce Thompson Institute for Plant ResearchIthacaUSA
  10. 10.Department of MicrobiologyCornell UniversityIthacaUSA
  11. 11.Department of Medical Microbiology and ImmunologyUniversity of Wisconsin-MadisonMadisonUSA
  12. 12.DOE Great Lakes Bioenergy Research CenterUniversity of Wisconsin-MadisonMadisonUSA
  13. 13.Department of EntomologyUniversity of Wisconsin-MadisonMadisonUSA
  14. 14.Marine Biological Laboratory, MCZ Labs 408Harvard UniversityCambridgeUSA
  15. 15.Université Montpellier II, Centre d’Ecologie Fonctionnelle et EvolutiveCNRSMontpellierFrance
  16. 16.Department of Microbiology and ImmunologyStanford University School of MedicineStanfordUSA
  17. 17.Department of EntomologyUniversity of ArizonaTucsonUSA
  18. 18.Institute of Environmental Sciences, Institute of Environmental SciencesJagiellonian UniversityKrakówPoland
  19. 19.The Samuel Roberts Noble FoundationArdmoreUSA
  20. 20.Department of Microbiology and ImmunologyLoyola University Medical CenterMaywoodUSA
  21. 21.Department of ZoologyOregon State UniversityCorvallisUSA

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