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Journal of Food Science and Technology

, Volume 55, Issue 9, pp 3703–3711 | Cite as

Antifungal activity of Lactobacillus plantarum C10 against Trichothecium roseum and its application in promotion of defense responses in muskmelon (Cucumis melo L.) fruit

  • Xinran Lv
  • Huanhuan Ma
  • Yang Lin
  • Fengling Bai
  • Yonghong Ge
  • Defu Zhang
  • Jianrong Li
Original Article
  • 49 Downloads

Abstract

The antifungal effect of Lactobacillus plantarum C10 on pink rot caused by Trichothecium roseum and its application in muskmelon fruit were investigated. Cell-free supernatant (CFS) produced by Lactobacillus plantarum C10 strongly inhibited the growth of T. roseum and seriously damaged the structures of spores and mycelia of T. roseum. Acid compounds produced by Lb. plantarum C10 were the major antifungal substances and exhibited a narrow pH range from 3.5 to 6.5. Application of the CFS on muskmelon fruit reduced the contamination zone of T. roseum by enhancing the activities of defensive enzymes (phenylalanine ammonialyase, peroxidase and polyphenoloxidase) and promoting the accumulation of phenolics and flavonoids. These results suggested that Lb. plantarum C10 could be used as a biocontrol agent to control pink rot caused by T. roseum in muskmelon fruit.

Keywords

Lactobacillus plantarum C10 Antifungal activity Trichothecium roseum Acid compounds Defensive enzymes Muskmelon fruit 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This study was funded by the Research Project from Science and Technology Department of Liaoning Province of China (No. 2015103020), and the Team Support Program for the Taishan Scholar of Blue Industry leading personnel of Shandong Province of China (LZBZ2015-19).

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Copyright information

© Association of Food Scientists & Technologists (India) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Xinran Lv
    • 1
    • 2
  • Huanhuan Ma
    • 1
    • 2
  • Yang Lin
    • 1
    • 2
  • Fengling Bai
    • 1
    • 2
  • Yonghong Ge
    • 1
    • 2
  • Defu Zhang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Jianrong Li
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.College of Food Science and EngineeringBohai UniversityJinzhouChina
  2. 2.National and Local Joint Engineering Research Center of Storage, Processing and Safety Control Technology for Fresh Agricultural and Aquatic ProductsJinzhouChina

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