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Journal of Food Science and Technology

, Volume 54, Issue 10, pp 3102–3110 | Cite as

Effect of walnut protein hydrolysate on scopolamine-induced learning and memory deficits in mice

  • Wenzhi Li
  • Tiantian Zhao
  • Jianan Zhang
  • Jucai Xu
  • Dongxiao Sun-Waterhouse
  • Mouming Zhao
  • Guowan Su
Original Article

Abstract

A walnut protein hydrolysate (WPH) was prepared by using a mixture of pancreatin and viscozyme L from industrially available defatted walnut meal. The antioxidant effects of WPH were confirmed and quantified by reducing power, oxygen radical absorbance capacity, hydroxyl radical radical-scavenging activity and ABTS+· radical-scavenging activity assays. The protective effects of WPH on scopolamine-induced learning and memory deficits in mice were also evaluated based on in vivo behavioral tests. Results showed that WPH administration would lead to significantly decreased latencies while increased crossing times and target times in the spatial probe test, and increased escape latency and decreased error times in the step-down avoidance test for the scopolamine-induced dementia mice. Biochemical results indicated that the ameliorative effects of WPH on scopolamine-induced dementia mice could be attributed to the significantly increased amount of acetylcholine receptors. Therefore, WPH may be a potential therapeutic agent against Alzheimer’s disease.

Keywords

Walnut protein hydrolysate Antioxidant Scopolamine-induced dementia Memory deficits Acetylcholine receptors 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The authors gratefully acknowledge Strategic Emerging Industry Key Scientific and Technological Program of Guangdong Province (No. 2012A080800014), Guangzhou Science and Technology Plan Projects (No. 201604020122) and special funds for public welfare research and capacity building in Guangdong Province (NO. 2014B020204001) for their financial supports.

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© Association of Food Scientists & Technologists (India) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Wenzhi Li
    • 1
    • 2
  • Tiantian Zhao
    • 1
    • 2
  • Jianan Zhang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Jucai Xu
    • 1
    • 2
  • Dongxiao Sun-Waterhouse
    • 1
    • 2
  • Mouming Zhao
    • 1
    • 2
  • Guowan Su
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.School of Food Science and EngineeringSouth China University of TechnologyGuangzhouChina
  2. 2.Guangdong Food Green Processing and Nutrition Regulation Technologies Research CenterGuangzhouChina

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