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Journal of Food Science and Technology

, Volume 53, Issue 12, pp 4348–4353 | Cite as

Vacuum impregnation: a promising way for mineral fortification in potato porous matrix (potato chips)

  • Alka Joshi
  • A. Kar
  • S. G. Rudra
  • V. R. Sagar
  • E. Varghese
  • M. Lad
  • I. Khan
  • B. Singh
Short Communication

Abstract

Potato chips can be considered as an ideal carrier for targeted nutrient/s delivery as mostly consumed by the vulnerable group (children and teen agers). The present study was planned to fortifiy potato chips with calcium (Calcium lactate) and zinc (Zinc sulphate) using vacuum impregnation technique. At about 70–80 mm Hg vacuum pressure, maximum level of impregnation of both the minerals was achieved. Results showed that after optimization, calcium lactate at 4.81%, zinc sulphate at 0.72%, and vacuum of 33.53 mm Hg with restoration period of 19.52 min can fortify potato chips that can fulfil 10 and 21% need of calcium and zinc, respectively of targeted group (age 4–17 years). The present research work has shown that through this technique, fortification can be done in potato chips which are generally considered as a poor source of minerals. Further to make potato chips more fit to health conscious consumers, rather frying microwaving was done to develop mineral fortified low fat potato chips.

Keywords

Vacuum impregnation Fortification Potato chips Calcium Zinc 

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Copyright information

© Association of Food Scientists & Technologists (India) 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alka Joshi
    • 1
  • A. Kar
    • 2
  • S. G. Rudra
    • 2
  • V. R. Sagar
    • 2
  • E. Varghese
    • 3
  • M. Lad
    • 2
  • I. Khan
    • 2
  • B. Singh
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Crop Physiology, Biochemistry and Post Harvest TechnologyCentral Potato Research InstituteShimlaIndia
  2. 2.Division of Food Science and Post Harvest TechnologyIndian Agricultural Research Institute, Pusa-DelhiNew DelhiIndia
  3. 3.ICAR-Indian Agricultural Statistics Research InstituteNew DelhiIndia

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