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Journal of Food Science and Technology

, Volume 52, Issue 1, pp 568–573 | Cite as

Effect of cryogenic grinding on volatile oil, oleoresin content and anti-oxidant properties of coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.) genotypes

  • S. N. Saxena
  • Y. K. Sharma
  • S. S. Rathore
  • K. K. Singh
  • P. Barnwal
  • Rohit Saxena
  • Payal Upadhyaya
  • M. M. Anwer
Original Article

Abstract

Effect of cryogenic grinding on volatile oil, oleoresin content, total phenolics, flavonoid content and anti-oxidant properties of seed extract of nine coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.) genotypes have been analyzed. Volatile oil and oleoresin content was significantly high in cryogenically ground samples ranged from 0.14 % in genotype RCr 436 to 0.39 % in genotype Sindhu while oleoresin content was ranged from 13.80 % in ACr 1 to 19.58 % in Australia. Yield of methanol crude seed extract was invariably high in cryo ground samples of all the genotypes and total phenolic content was also high in all the genotypes. It was ranging from a minimum of 32.44 mg in RCr 41 to a maximum of 92.99 mg Gallic Acid Equivalent (GAE)/g crude seed extract in genotype Sindhu. Similarly Total flavanoid content was also increase in all cryogenically ground samples and ranged from 15.28 mg Quercetin Equivalent (QE)/g crude seed extract in genotype Sindhu to 20.85 mg QE/g crude seed extract in genotype Swati. Methanol crude seed extract of all genotypes were evaluated for its antioxidant activity in terms of total antioxidant content, 1, 1-Diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazin (DPPH) free radical scavenging % and EC50 value. The amount of total antioxidant content in cryo ground seeds was significantly high in all genotypes which was ranging from 5.09 mg in genotype Sindhu to 10.85 mg Butyl Hydroxyl Toluene (BHT) Equivalent/g crude seed extract in genotype Sadhna. DPPH scavenging % was invariably more in cryo ground seeds in all the genotypes. Higher concentration of antioxidant content and DPPH scavenging % suggested high antioxidant activity in cryo ground samples. It could be concluded that cryogenic grinding technology is able to retain flavour and antioxidant properties of coriander irrespective of the genotypes.

Keywords

Antioxidant Cryogenic grinding Coriander Oleoresin Volatile oil 

Notes

Acknowledgment

Presented work is carried out under National Agriculture Innovation Project Component 4 supported by World Bank. The authors are thankful to Indian Council of Agriculture Research, New Delhi, CIPHET, Ludhiana and NRCSS, Ajmer for providing necessary facilities to carry out this work.

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Copyright information

© Association of Food Scientists & Technologists (India) 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. N. Saxena
    • 1
  • Y. K. Sharma
    • 1
  • S. S. Rathore
    • 1
  • K. K. Singh
    • 2
  • P. Barnwal
    • 3
  • Rohit Saxena
    • 1
  • Payal Upadhyaya
    • 4
  • M. M. Anwer
    • 1
  1. 1.National Research Centre on Seed SpicesAjmerIndia
  2. 2.Krishi Anusandhan Bhawan II, PusaICARNew DelhiIndia
  3. 3.PAU CampusCentral Institute for Post Harvest Engineering and Technology, LudhianaLudhianaIndia
  4. 4.A. N. Patel P. G. Institute, AnandSardar Patel UniversityVallabh VidyanagarIndia

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