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Journal of Food Science and Technology

, Volume 49, Issue 5, pp 649–652 | Cite as

Effect of abscisic acid and hydrogen peroxide on antioxidant enzymes in Syzygium cumini plant

  • Ramkishan Choudhary
  • Ajaya Eesha Saroha
  • P. L. Swarnkar
Short Communication

Abstract

The present study was undertaken to study the effect of abscisic acid and hydrogen peroxide on the activities of antioxidant enzymes namely superoxide dismutase (SOD; E.C. 1.15.1.1), catalase (CAT; E.C. 1.11.1.6) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX; E.C. 1.11.1.11) in Syzygium cumini plant. The varying concentrations of ABA (2–8 mM/l) and H2O2 (2–8 mM/l) modulated enzyme activities differently. In general, some concentrations of the ABA and H2O2 stimulated the activities of all the three enzymes except that there was a dose dependent reduction in catalase activity in the plants treated with ABA.

Keywords

Antioxidant enzymes Abscisic acid Hydrogen peroxide Reactive oxygen species 

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Copyright information

© Association of Food Scientists & Technologists (India) 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ramkishan Choudhary
    • 1
  • Ajaya Eesha Saroha
    • 1
  • P. L. Swarnkar
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of BotanyUniversity of RajasthanJaipurIndia

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