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Journal of Food Science and Technology

, Volume 50, Issue 3, pp 542–548 | Cite as

Effect of cooking temperatures on protein hydrolysates and sensory quality in crucian carp (Carassius auratus) soup

  • Jinjie Zhang
  • Yanjia Yao
  • Xingqian Ye
  • Zhongxiang Fang
  • Jianchu Chen
  • Dan Wu
  • Donghong Liu
  • Yaqin Hu
Original Article

Abstract

Cooking methods have a significant impact on flavour compounds in fish soup. The effects of cooking temperatures (55, 65, 75, 85, 95, and 100 °C) on sensory properties and protein hydrolysates were studied in crucian carp (Carassius auratus) soup. The results showed that the soup prepared at 85 °C had the best sensory quality in color, flavour, amour, and soup pattern. Cooking temperature had significant influence on the hydrolysis of proteins in the soup showed by SDS-PAGE result. The contents of water soluble nitrogen (WSN) and non-protein nitrogen (NPN) increased with the cooking temperature, but the highest contents of total peptides and total free amino acids (FAA) were obtained at the cooking temperature of 85 °C. The highest contents of umami-taste active amino acid and branched-chain amino acids were also observed in the 85 °C sample. In conclusion, a cooking temperature of 85 °C was preferred for more excellent flavor and higher nutritional value of crucian carp soup.

Keywords

Crucian carp Cooking temperature Protein Hydrolysates Flavour 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This work was supported by the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities (KYJD09033), NSFC (30972282) and the national program of ‘985’ (project number 707034). The authors also acknowledge the Science and Technology Department of Zhejiang Province for partial financial support (2008 C12019, 2010 C12012).

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Copyright information

© Association of Food Scientists & Technologists (India) 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jinjie Zhang
    • 1
  • Yanjia Yao
    • 1
  • Xingqian Ye
    • 1
  • Zhongxiang Fang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Jianchu Chen
    • 1
  • Dan Wu
    • 1
  • Donghong Liu
    • 1
  • Yaqin Hu
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Food Science and Nutrition, School of Biosystems Engineering and Food ScienceZhejiang UniversityHangzhouChina
  2. 2.School of Land, Crop and Food SciencesThe University of QueenslandBrisbaneAustralia

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