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Journal of Food Science and Technology

, Volume 47, Issue 4, pp 365–371 | Cite as

Utilization of pomace from apple processing industries: a review

  • Rachana ShaliniEmail author
  • D. K. Gupta
Review

Abstract

In large scale apple juice industry, about 75% of apple is utilized for juice and the remaining 25% is the by-product, apple pomace. In India, total production of apple pomace is about 1 million tons per annum and only approximately 10,000 tons of apple pomace is being utilized. Generally, apple pomace is thrown away, which causes environmental pollution. As the pomace is a part of fruit, it has potential for being converted into edible products. Apple pomace is a rich source of carbohydrate, pectin, crude fiber, and minerals, and as such is a good source of nutrients. This paper reviews the work done to utilize this precious resource, which can prove useful for setting up of small scale industries.

Keywords

Apple pomace Waste utilization Apple processing industries Nutritional aspects Edible products 

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Copyright information

© Association of Food Scientists & Technologists (India) 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Agricultural Process and Food EngineeringAllahabad Agricultural Institute — Deemed UniversityAllahabadIndia
  2. 2.Department of Post-harvest Process and Food EngineeringG.B. Pant University of Agriculture and TechnologyPantnagarIndia

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