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Indian Journal of Surgical Oncology

, Volume 9, Issue 4, pp 552–557 | Cite as

Pelvic Exenteration Put into Therapeutical and Palliative Perspective: It Is Worth to Try

  • Iosifina Karmaniolou
  • Nikolaos Arkadopoulos
  • Pantelis Vassiliou
  • Constantinos Nastos
  • Dionysios Dellaportas
  • Argyris Siatelis
  • Theodosis Theodosopoulos
  • Antonios Vezakis
  • Stavros Parasyris
  • Andreas Polydorou
  • Vassilios Smyrniotis
Original Article
  • 19 Downloads

Abstract

Pelvic exenteration (PE) is one of the most drastic operations in surgical oncology, associated with severe morbidity and mortality. The objective of our study was to review our experience of PE in terms of surgical characteristics, complications, and overall survival. All patients who had PE surgery between January 1999 and December 2015 were identified. Patients with verified distant metastatic disease were excluded. Patients with advanced pelvic tumors experiencing incapacitating postradiation severe damages were included. The following parameters were recorded: age, sex, indication for surgery, tumor histology, type of exenteration, urinary tract and colon reconstruction methods, operative time, blood transfusion, intensive care unit admissions, length of hospital stay and readmissions, and characteristics of perioperative morbidity and mortality. A total of 25 patients were submitted to PE by our surgical team. Most of the patients suffered from cervical cancer followed by bowel cancer. There was no perioperative mortality. Early postoperative complications ensued in 56% of the patients. Most complications involved the urinary system. Five years survival was estimated at 38%. Most patients (n = 9, 36%) died due to their primary disease, 5 (20%) died because of complications following operation, and 2 (8%) died because they denied oral feeding, which was associated with depression. Patients with a variety of malignancies can benefit from PE. Meticulous surgical technique, perioperative care, counseling, and nutritional support play an important role.

Keywords

Pelvic exenteration Pelvic malignancy Cervical cancer Gynecologic cancer Colon cancer 

Notes

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Local Ethics Committee approval was applied for but was not deemed necessary by our hospital committee due to the retrospective nature of our study.

Conflict of Interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© Indian Association of Surgical Oncology 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Iosifina Karmaniolou
    • 1
  • Nikolaos Arkadopoulos
    • 2
  • Pantelis Vassiliou
    • 2
  • Constantinos Nastos
    • 3
  • Dionysios Dellaportas
    • 3
  • Argyris Siatelis
    • 2
  • Theodosis Theodosopoulos
    • 3
  • Antonios Vezakis
    • 3
  • Stavros Parasyris
    • 2
  • Andreas Polydorou
    • 3
  • Vassilios Smyrniotis
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of AnaesthesiaGuy’s and St Thomas’ NHS Foundation TrustLondonUK
  2. 2.2nd Department of Surgery, Attikon HospitalUniversity of Athens Medical SchoolChaidariGreece
  3. 3.2nd Department of Surgery, Aretaieion HospitalUniversity of Athens Medical SchoolAthensGreece

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