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Training Future Leaders: Experience from China-ASEAN Cancer Control Training Program

  • Remila Rezhake
  • Xiao-Qian Xu
  • Sandrine Montigny
  • Anouk Berger
  • Shang-Ying Hu
  • Zhi-Hua Liu
  • Rengaswamy Sankaranarayanan
  • You-Lin Qiao
  • Partha Basu
  • Fang-Hui Zhao
Article
  • 60 Downloads

Abstract

Cancer care professionals are pivotal in translating the knowledge into action in the continuum of cancer control process. Unfortunately, in China and the Association of South-east Asian Nations (ASEAN), limited training opportunities are available for health professionals in the area of cancer prevention and control. Therefore, the Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences (CICAMS), and the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) collaboratively designed and held the China-ASEAN Cancer Control and Prevention Training Program to provide continuing education opportunities for cancer professionals from China and ASEAN countries. The aim of this article is to report on the effectiveness and quality of the program and share our experience. A total of 36 participants from 12 countries completed the whole course including 1-month online learning and 1-week face-to-face workshop and cancer control facility tour in October 2017. After completion of the program, all participants were invited to fill out a questionnaire and to provide their comments on the training course. Out of 36 participants, 33 completed the evaluation form and they rated the training course highly in terms of satisfaction, value, and likelihood of recommending it to other colleagues. Additionally, all participants provided very detailed and practical comments on the course. Such an intensive, short-term, and comprehensive training program is expected to help participants establish a broader view of cancer prevention and control within the wider health services and be involved in national cancer control programs in a more efficient way. This training course could serve as a model for other institutes dedicated to nurturing future leaders in cancer control.

Keywords

Continuing medical education Curriculum evaluation Professional development Cancer control 

Notes

Acknowledgements

We acknowledge Mrs. Krittika Pitaksaringkarn and Mr. Yong Jiang for their work in assisting with the planning of the training course. We also acknowledge Drs. Ping Zhao, Catherine Sauvaget, Filip Meheus, Hextan Yuen Sheung Ngan, Wan-Qing Chen, Xiao-Nong Zou, Wen-Qing Li, Guang-Wen Cao, Xi Lin, Ji-Hong Liu, and Yue-Yun Wang for serving as training faculty.

Authors’ Contributions

Study concept and design: RS, YLQ, PB, FHZ; Acquisition, analysis, or interpretation of data: RR, SM, AB; Drafting of the manuscript: RR, XQX; Obtained funding: FHZ, YLQ, ZHL; Administrative, technical, or material support: SM, AB, PB; Study supervision: YLQ, RS. All authors read and approved the final manuscript.

Funding

The training program was funded by Department of International Cooperation, National Health and Family Planning Commission of Peoples of China; Cancer Foundation of China; Beijing Hope Run Excellent Scientist Fund (project no. PY2018A02); and Sanming Project of Medicine in Shenzhen (project no. SZSM201612024).

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Consent for Publication

Participants were asked to fill in a questionnaire which was developed to assess the effectiveness and quality of the training course after completion of the program. Before completing the questionnaire, participants were reminded of our intention to do the evaluation and of their right not to proceed with it if they no longer wished to and written consent was obtained.

Competing Interests

The authors declare that they have no competing interests.

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Copyright information

© American Association for Cancer Education 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Remila Rezhake
    • 1
  • Xiao-Qian Xu
    • 1
  • Sandrine Montigny
    • 2
  • Anouk Berger
    • 2
  • Shang-Ying Hu
    • 1
  • Zhi-Hua Liu
    • 3
  • Rengaswamy Sankaranarayanan
    • 4
    • 5
  • You-Lin Qiao
    • 1
  • Partha Basu
    • 5
  • Fang-Hui Zhao
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Cancer Epidemiology, National Cancer Center/National Clinical Research Center for Cancer/Cancer HospitalChinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical CollegeBeijingChina
  2. 2.Education and Training GroupInternational Agency for Research on CancerLyonFrance
  3. 3.Department of GynecologyShenzhen Maternity and Child Healthcare HospitalShenzhenChina
  4. 4.RTI (Research Triangle Institute) International-IndiaNew DelhiIndia
  5. 5.Screening Group, Early Detection and Prevention SectionInternational Agency for Research on CancerLyon CEDEX 08France

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