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Development and Implementation of a Continuing Medical Education Program in Canada: Knowledge Translation for Renal Cell Carcinoma (KT4RCC)

  • Luke T. Lavallée
  • Ryan Fitzpatrick
  • Lori A. Wood
  • Joan Basiuk
  • Christopher Knee
  • Sonya Cnossen
  • Ranjeeta Mallick
  • Kelsey Witiuk
  • Marie Vanhuyse
  • Simon Tanguay
  • Antonio Finelli
  • Michael A. S. Jewett
  • Naveen Basappa
  • Jean-Baptiste Lattouf
  • Geoffrey T. Gotto
  • Sohaib Al-Asaaed
  • Georg A. Bjarnason
  • Ronald Moore
  • Scott North
  • Christina Canil
  • Frédéric Pouliot
  • Denis Soulières
  • Vincent Castonguay
  • Wassim Kassouf
  • Ilias Cagiannos
  • Chris Morash
  • Rodney H. Breau
Article

Abstract

An in-person multidisciplinary continuing medical education (CME) program was designed to address previously identified knowledge gaps regarding quality indicators of care in kidney cancer. The objective of this study was to develop a CME program and determine if the program was effective for improving participant knowledge. CME programs for clinicians were delivered by local experts (uro-oncologist and medical oncologist) in four Canadian cities. Participants completed knowledge assessment tests pre-CME, immediately post-CME, and 3-month post-CME. Test questions were related to topics covered in the CME program including prognostic factors for advanced disease, surgery for advanced disease, indications for hereditary screening, systemic therapy, and management of small renal masses. Fifty-two participants attended the CME program and completed the pre- and immediate post-CME tests. Participants attended in Ottawa (14; 27%), Toronto (13; 25%), Québec City (18; 35%), and Montréal (7; 13%) and were staff urologists (21; 40%), staff medical oncologists (9; 17%), fellows (5; 10%), residents (16; 31%), and oncology nurses (1; 2%). The mean pre-CME test score was 61% and the mean post-CME test score was 70% (p = 0.003). Twenty-one participants (40%) completed the 3-month post-CME test. Of those that completed the post-test, scores remained 10% higher than the pre-test (p value 0.01). Variability in test scores was observed across sites and between French and English test versions. Urologists had the largest specialty-specific increase in knowledge at 13.8% (SD 24.2, p value 0.02). The kidney cancer CME program was moderately effective in improving provider knowledge regarding quality indicators of kidney cancer care. These findings support continued use of this CME program at other sites.

Keywords

Kidney cancer Knowledge translation Continuing medical education 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This project was supported by an unrestricted grant from Kidney Cancer Canada and the Kidney Cancer Research Network of Canada.

Compliance with Ethical Standards

The authors would like to disclose the following potential conflicts of interest:

Previous Dissemination

None

Disclaimers

None

Supplementary material

13187_2017_1259_MOESM1_ESM.docx (22 kb)
ESM 1 (DOCX 21 kb)

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Copyright information

© American Association for Cancer Education 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Luke T. Lavallée
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Ryan Fitzpatrick
    • 1
    • 3
  • Lori A. Wood
    • 4
    • 5
  • Joan Basiuk
    • 6
  • Christopher Knee
    • 2
  • Sonya Cnossen
    • 2
  • Ranjeeta Mallick
    • 2
  • Kelsey Witiuk
    • 2
  • Marie Vanhuyse
    • 7
  • Simon Tanguay
    • 7
  • Antonio Finelli
    • 6
    • 8
    • 9
  • Michael A. S. Jewett
    • 9
  • Naveen Basappa
    • 10
    • 11
  • Jean-Baptiste Lattouf
    • 12
    • 13
  • Geoffrey T. Gotto
    • 14
  • Sohaib Al-Asaaed
    • 15
  • Georg A. Bjarnason
    • 16
  • Ronald Moore
    • 10
    • 11
  • Scott North
    • 10
    • 11
  • Christina Canil
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Frédéric Pouliot
    • 17
  • Denis Soulières
    • 12
  • Vincent Castonguay
    • 18
  • Wassim Kassouf
    • 7
  • Ilias Cagiannos
    • 1
    • 3
  • Chris Morash
    • 1
    • 3
  • Rodney H. Breau
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Division of Urology, Department of SurgeryThe Ottawa HospitalOttawaCanada
  2. 2.Ottawa Hospital Research InstituteOttawaCanada
  3. 3.University of OttawaOttawaCanada
  4. 4.QEII Health Sciences CentreHalifaxCanada
  5. 5.Dalhousie UniversityHalifaxCanada
  6. 6.University Health NetworkTorontoCanada
  7. 7.McGill UniversityMontrealCanada
  8. 8.Princess Margaret Cancer CentreTorontoCanada
  9. 9.University of TorontoTorontoCanada
  10. 10.Cross Cancer InstituteEdmontonCanada
  11. 11.University of AlbertaEdmontonCanada
  12. 12.Centre hospitalier de l’Université de MontréalMontrealCanada
  13. 13.Université de MontréalMontrealCanada
  14. 14.University of CalgaryCalgaryCanada
  15. 15.Memorial UniversitySt. John’sCanada
  16. 16.Sunnybrook Odette Cancer CentreTorontoCanada
  17. 17.Université LavalQuebec CityCanada
  18. 18.Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de QuébecQuebec CityCanada

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