Journal of Cancer Education

, Volume 33, Issue 2, pp 440–447 | Cite as

Development of a Targeted Smoking Relapse-Prevention Intervention for Cancer Patients

  • Lauren R. Meltzer
  • Cathy D. Meade
  • Diana B. Diaz
  • Monica S. Carrington
  • Thomas H. Brandon
  • Paul B. Jacobsen
  • Judith C. McCaffrey
  • Eric B. Haura
  • Vani N. Simmons
Article

Abstract

We describe the series of iterative steps used to develop a smoking relapse-prevention intervention customized to the needs of cancer patients. Informed by relevant literature and a series of preliminary studies, an educational tool (DVD) was developed to target the unique smoking relapse risk factors among cancer patients. Learner verification interviews were conducted with 10 cancer patients who recently quit smoking to elicit feedback and inform the development of the DVD. The DVD was then refined using iterative processes and feedback from the learner verification interviews. Major changes focused on visual appeal, and the inclusion of additional testimonials and graphics to increase comprehension of key points and further emphasize the message that the patient is in control of their ability to maintain their smoking abstinence. Together, these steps resulted in the creation of a DVD titled Surviving Smokefree®, which represents the first smoking relapse-prevention intervention for cancer patients. If found effective, the Surviving Smokefree® DVD is an easily disseminable and low-cost portable intervention which can assist cancer patients in maintaining smoking abstinence.

Keywords

Smoking Cancer Educational intervention Relapse-prevention Formative research 

Notes

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Funding Sources

This work was supported by the National Institutes of Health (R01CA154596-02 ).

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Copyright information

© American Association for Cancer Education 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lauren R. Meltzer
    • 1
  • Cathy D. Meade
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Diana B. Diaz
    • 1
  • Monica S. Carrington
    • 1
  • Thomas H. Brandon
    • 1
    • 2
    • 4
    • 5
  • Paul B. Jacobsen
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Judith C. McCaffrey
    • 6
    • 7
  • Eric B. Haura
    • 5
  • Vani N. Simmons
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 5
  1. 1.Department of Health Outcomes and Behavior, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer CenterTampaUSA
  2. 2.Department of Oncologic SciencesUniversity of South FloridaTampaUSA
  3. 3.Department of NursingUniversity of South FloridaTampaUSA
  4. 4.Department of PsychologyUniversity of South FloridaTampaUSA
  5. 5.Department of Thoracic Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer CenterTampaUSA
  6. 6.Department of OtolaryngologyUniversity of South FloridaTampaUSA
  7. 7.Department of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer CenterTampaUSA

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