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Journal of Cancer Education

, Volume 32, Issue 4, pp 745–748 | Cite as

Cancer Awareness in Aotearoa New Zealand (CAANZ), 2001 and 2015: Study Protocols

  • Rosalina RichardsEmail author
  • Bronwen McNoe
  • Ella Iosua
  • Anthony Reeder
  • Richard Egan
  • Louise Marsh
  • Lindsay Robertson
  • Brett Maclennan
  • Anna Dawson
  • Robin Quigg
  • Anne-Cathrine Petersen
Article

Abstract

Population cancer awareness is of interest worldwide, as efforts are made to reduce cancer incidence via changes in risk and protective behaviours. To date, few studies have described changes in awareness over time, despite significant investment in raising awareness about various cancer types and risk behaviours. This paper describes the Cancer Awareness in Aotearoa New Zealand (CAANZ) survey, a cross-sectional telephone survey of adult New Zealanders conducted in 2014/2015 (CAANZ15, n = 1064) and its comparison with a similar 2001 study (CAANZ01, n = 438). Both aimed to describe current cancer awareness among a national sample of New Zealand (NZ) adults, with additional aims for CAANZ15 being to explore emerging issues in information provision and supportive care. Follow-up studies are challenged by changes in communication technologies and, in turn, potential issues in sampling. However, given the value of information about changing awareness, pragmatic steps were taken in CAANZ15 to maximise the response rate and comparability of the surveys. A response rate of 64 % was achieved for both samples. When compared to the adult NZ population, the CAANZ15 sample tended to be older, of higher socioeconomic status and under-representative of people with Pacific, Asian or, to a lesser extent, Māori (the indigenous population of NZ) ethnicity. To compensate for possible disproportionate age-by-ethnicity (Māori/non-Māori) groups in the sample, poststratification weighting was adopted. While caution will need to be exercised in drawing conclusions from comparisons made between these two cohorts, the dearth of such studies means that insights gained should be useful for guiding reflection on future cancer control directions and the generation of new hypotheses.

Keywords

Awareness Perceptions Cross-sectional 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The Cancer Society Social and Behavioural Research Unit received support from the Cancer Society of New Zealand and the University of Otago. Ms Robertson is supported by a stipend from Lottery Health NZ. The authors would like to acknowledge the work of our team of interviewers and to thank the participants for their time and willingness to share their thoughts and perspectives.

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Ethical approval for CAANZ01 and CAANZ15 was obtained from the University of Otago Ethics Committee (Reference number 00/03/10) and the Department of Preventive and Social Medicine Ethics Committee (Reference number D14/369), respectively.

Conflict of Interest

The Cancer Society Social and Behavioural Research Unit received support from the Cancer Society of New Zealand.

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Copyright information

© American Association for Cancer Education 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rosalina Richards
    • 1
    Email author
  • Bronwen McNoe
    • 1
  • Ella Iosua
    • 2
  • Anthony Reeder
    • 1
  • Richard Egan
    • 1
  • Louise Marsh
    • 1
  • Lindsay Robertson
    • 1
  • Brett Maclennan
    • 1
  • Anna Dawson
    • 3
  • Robin Quigg
    • 1
  • Anne-Cathrine Petersen
    • 1
  1. 1.Cancer Society Social and Behavioural Research Unit, Department of Preventive and Social Medicine, Dunedin School of MedicineUniversity of OtagoDunedinNew Zealand
  2. 2.Department of Preventive and Social Medicine, Dunedin School of MedicineUniversity of OtagoDunedinNew Zealand
  3. 3.Kōhatu – Centre for Hauora Māori, Division of Health SciencesUniversity of OtagoDunedinNew Zealand

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