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ACMT Position Statement: Interpretation of Urine for Tetrahydrocannabinol Metabolites

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Author information

Correspondence to Andrew I. Stolbach.

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While individual practices may differ, this is the position of the American College of Medical Toxicology at the time written, after a review of the issue and pertinent literature.

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Connors, N., Kosnett, M.J., Kulig, K. et al. ACMT Position Statement: Interpretation of Urine for Tetrahydrocannabinol Metabolites. J. Med. Toxicol. (2020) doi:10.1007/s13181-019-00753-8

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Keywords

  • Cannabidiol
  • Cannabinoid
  • Drug testing
  • THC
  • Urine tox screen