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Correction to: TransAction: A Homegrown, Theory-Based, HIV Risk Reduction Intervention for Transgender Women Experiencing Multiple Health Disparities

  • Cathy J. RebackEmail author
  • Kirsty Clark
  • Jesse B. Fletcher
Correction
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Correction to: Sexuality Research and Social Policy

  https://doi.org/10.1007/s13178-018-0356-7

The original version of this article unfortunately contained a mistake in Table 3. Thus, this correction is to fix this error, providing the correct Table.
Table 3

Adjusted negative binomial and logistic regressions of participant risk behaviors on intervention visit (n = 512)

 

# Male Sexual Partnersa,b

# Anonymous Male Sexual Partnersa,b

# Exchange Male Sexual Partnersa,b

Engagement in Sex Worka,c

 

Neg. Bin. Coef.

95% CI

Neg. Bin. Coef.

95% CI

Neg. Bin. Coef.

95% CI

Logit Coef.

95% CI

Intervention Visit (1 thru 4)

–0.20***

–0.30; –0.09

–0.25**

–0.44; –0.06

–0.25***

–0.38; –0.12

–0.20***

–0.32; –0.09

 

Injection Drug Usea,c

Unmonitored Injection Hormone Usea,c

Sex While Higha,c

Drug/Alcohol Usea,c

 

Logit Coef.

95% CI

Logit Coef.

95% CI

Logit Coef.

95% CI

Logit Coef.

95% CI

Intervention Visit (1 thru 4)

–0.20*

–0.40; 0.00

–0.55***

–0.82; –0.27

–0.23***

–0.33; –0.12

–0.37***

–0.48; –0.25

Logit Coef. = Coefficient from logistic regression; Neg. Bin. Coef. = Coefficient from negative binomial regression

aStatistical Controls: Racial/Ethnic Identity, Age, HIV Status

bCross-sectional time-series negative binomial regression (Recall period: Past 30 days)

cCross-sectional time-series logistic regression

*p ≤ 0.05; **p ≤ 0.01; *** ≤0.001

In the body “Table 3 provides adjusted associations between intervention attendance and these same sexual partnering and risk behavior outcomes, adjusted for participant sociodemographics and repeated measures over time (n = 512). Increased attendance in TransAction intervention sessions was associated with significant reductions in the number of male sexual partners (ARR = −0.20; p ≤ 0.001), anonymous male sexual partners (ARR = −0.30; p ≤ 0.01), exchange male sexual partners (ARR = −0.25; p ≤ 0.001), drug/alcohol use (AOR = −0.37; p ≤ 0.001), injection drug use (AOR= −0.20; p ≤ 0.05), unmonitored injection hormone use (AOR = −0.55; p ≤ 0.001), sex while under the influence of alcohol/drugs (AOR = −0.23; p ≤ 0.001), and engagement in sex work (AOR = −0.20; p ≤ 0.001). All multivariate models demonstrated a significantly good fit to the data (all χ2(6) > 25.5; p <0.001).” should be changed to “Table 3 provides adjusted associations between intervention attendance and these same sexual partnering and risk behavior outcomes, adjusted for participant sociodemographics and repeated measures over time (n = 512). Increased attendance in TransAction intervention sessions was associated with significant reductions in the number of male sexual partners (neg. bin. coef. = −0.20; p ≤ 0.001), anonymous male sexual partners (neg. bin. coef. = −0.30; p ≤ 0.01), exchange male sexual partners (neg. bin. coef. = −0.25; p ≤ 0.001), drug/alcohol use (logit coef. = −0.37; p ≤ 0.001), injection drug use (logit coef. = −0.20; p ≤ 0.05), unmonitored injection hormone use (logit coef. = −0.55; p ≤ 0.001), sex while under the influence of alcohol/drugs (logit coef. = −0.23; p ≤ 0.001), and engagement in sex work (logit coef. = −0.20; p ≤ 0.001). All multivariate models demonstrated a significantly good fit to the data (all χ2(6) > 25.5; p < 0.001).”

Notes

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Cathy J. Reback
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    Email author
  • Kirsty Clark
    • 4
  • Jesse B. Fletcher
    • 1
  1. 1.Friends Research Institute, Inc.Los AngelesUSA
  2. 2.Integrated Substance Abuse Programs, Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human BehaviorUniversity of CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA
  3. 3.Center for HIV Identification, Prevention and Treatment ServicesUniversity of CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA
  4. 4.Department of Epidemiology, Fielding School of Public HealthUniversity of CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA

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