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Organic Agriculture

, Volume 4, Issue 4, pp 325–329 | Cite as

Measurement methods on pastures and their use in environmental life-cycle assessment

  • Magdalena Ohm
  • Maximilian Schüler
  • Sylvia Warnecke
  • Hans Marten Paulsen
  • Gerold Rahmann
Article

Abstract

Grassland agriculture plays an important role for livestock production and land management throughout the world. It is challenging to estimate the available feed on pasture plots. For this study, a rising plate meter was calibrated in swards of the organic experimental station of Trenthorst in northern Germany to calculate grazing intake of cattle and to determine biomass regrowth. A LCA-model (FARM) that was used to calculate the global warming potential (GWP) of milk of the station showed that substituting grass silage by grazing reduces the GWP per kilogram energy-corrected milk by 1.5 %. High differences of dry matter intake that were found between the plots indicate a potential for improving the grazing management and hence for further reducing the GWP of milk production.

Keywords

Grazing intake Dairy Global warming potential LCA 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Magdalena Ohm
    • 1
  • Maximilian Schüler
    • 1
  • Sylvia Warnecke
    • 1
  • Hans Marten Paulsen
    • 1
  • Gerold Rahmann
    • 1
  1. 1.Thuenen-Institute of Organic FarmingWesterauGermany

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