Translational Behavioral Medicine

, Volume 2, Issue 4, pp 446–458

NUTORC—a transdisciplinary health services and outcomes research team in transplantation

  • Daniela P. Ladner
  • Estella M. Alonso
  • Zeeshan Butt
  • Juan Carlos Caicedo
  • David Cella
  • Amna Daud
  • John J. Friedewald
  • Elisa J. Gordon
  • Gordon B. Hazen
  • Bing T. Ho
  • Kathleen R. Hoke
  • Jane L. Holl
  • Michael G. Ison
  • Raymond Kang
  • Sanjay Mehrotra
  • Luke B. Preczewski
  • Olivia A. Ross
  • Pamela H. Sharaf
  • Anton I. Skaro
  • Edward Wang
  • Michael S. Wolf
  • Donna M. Woods
  • Michael M. Abecassis
Case study
  • 162 Downloads

ABSTRACT

The field of solid organ transplantation has historically concentrated research efforts on basic science and translational studies. However, there has been increasing interest in health services and outcomes research. The aim was to build an effective and sustainable, inter- and transdisciplinary health services and outcomes research team (NUTORC), that leveraged institutional strengths in social science, engineering, and management disciplines, coupled with an international recognized transplant program. In 2008, leading methodological experts across the university were identified and intramural funding was obtained for the NUTORC initiative. Inter- and transdisciplinary collaborative teams were created across departments and schools within the university. Within 3 years, NUTORC became fiscally sustainable, yielding more than tenfold return of the initial investment. Academic productivity included funding for 39 grants, publication of 60 manuscripts, and 166 national presentations. Sustainable educational opportunities for students were created. Inter- and transdisciplinary health services and outcomes research in transplant can be innovative and sustainable.

KEYWORDS

Transdisciplinary research teams Health Services and Outcomes Research Educational opportunities Academic productivity Sustainable research efforts 

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Copyright information

© Society of Behavioral Medicine 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Daniela P. Ladner
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
    • 6
  • Estella M. Alonso
    • 1
    • 3
  • Zeeshan Butt
    • 1
    • 2
    • 4
    • 6
  • Juan Carlos Caicedo
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • David Cella
    • 4
  • Amna Daud
    • 1
    • 2
    • 6
  • John J. Friedewald
    • 1
    • 2
    • 5
  • Elisa J. Gordon
    • 1
    • 2
    • 6
  • Gordon B. Hazen
    • 7
  • Bing T. Ho
    • 1
    • 2
    • 5
  • Kathleen R. Hoke
    • 1
    • 6
  • Jane L. Holl
    • 3
    • 6
  • Michael G. Ison
    • 1
    • 2
    • 8
  • Raymond Kang
    • 1
    • 6
  • Sanjay Mehrotra
    • 7
  • Luke B. Preczewski
    • 1
    • 2
  • Olivia A. Ross
    • 1
    • 2
    • 6
  • Pamela H. Sharaf
    • 1
    • 6
  • Anton I. Skaro
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Edward Wang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Michael S. Wolf
    • 9
  • Donna M. Woods
    • 6
  • Michael M. Abecassis
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Northwestern University Transplant Outcomes Research Collaborative (NUTORC), Comprehensive Transplant Center, Feinberg School of MedicineNorthwestern UniversityChicagoUSA
  2. 2.Division of Transplantation, Department of SurgeryNorthwestern UniversityChicagoUSA
  3. 3.Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of ChicagoChicagoUSA
  4. 4.Department of Medical Social SciencesNorthwestern UniversityChicagoUSA
  5. 5.Division of Nephrology, Department of MedicineNorthwestern UniversityChicagoUSA
  6. 6.Center for Healthcare StudiesNorthwestern UniversityChicagoUSA
  7. 7.Department of Industrial Engineering and Management Sciences, McCormick School of EngineeringNorthwestern UniversityChicagoUSA
  8. 8.Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of MedicineNorthwestern UniversityChicagoUSA
  9. 9.Division of General Internal Medicine, Department of MedicineNorthwestern UniversityChicagoUSA

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