Acta Oceanologica Sinica

, Volume 35, Issue 1, pp 46–52 | Cite as

The diapycnal mixing in the upper Pacific estimated from GTSPP observations

  • Zeng’an Deng
  • Guanghao Wei
  • Ting Yu
  • Hongyu Wei
  • Linchong Kang
  • Luyao Han
Article

Abstract

Diapycnal mixing (DM) in the upper 600 m of the Pacific Ocean was estimated based on the huge amount of the observations from Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Programme (GTSPP), using the strain version of the finescale parameterization. It is found that DM in each season exhibits similar distribution pattern, but differs in details. The intensification of DM is related to bottom roughness, surface near-inertial energy, and proximity to the equator. The intensified DM caused by rough topography shows in the profiles near the Mendocino fracture zone in the northeast Pacific, and the heightened DM caused by wind-generated near-inertial energy appears in the westerly region of the Southern Ocean. As compared to previous estimates, the DM estimate in this work has better spatial coverage and finer resolution, and more importantly it contains the seasonal variability. Furthermore, the resulting DM dataset is gridded, rendering it suitable for modeling applications.

Key words

diapycnal mixing GTSPP fine-scale parameterization Pacific 

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Copyright information

© The Chinese Society of Oceanography and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Zeng’an Deng
    • 1
    • 2
  • Guanghao Wei
    • 2
  • Ting Yu
    • 2
  • Hongyu Wei
    • 2
  • Linchong Kang
    • 2
  • Luyao Han
    • 2
  1. 1.School of Marine Science and TechnologyTianjin UniversityTianjinChina
  2. 2.National Marine Data and Information ServiceTianjinChina

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