Acta Oceanologica Sinica

, Volume 33, Issue 1, pp 48–55 | Cite as

An analysis on the error structure and mechanism of soil moisture and ocean salinity remotely sensed sea surface salinity products

  • Jian Chen
  • Ren Zhang
  • Huizan Wang
  • Yuzhu An
  • Luhua Wang
  • Gongjie Wang
Articles

Abstract

For the application of soil moisture and ocean salinity (SMOS) remotely sensed sea surface salinity (SSS) products, SMOS SSS global maps and error characteristics have been investigated based on quality control information. The results show that the errors of SMOS SSS products are distributed zonally, i.e., relatively small in the tropical oceans, but much greater in the southern oceans in the Southern Hemisphere (negative bias) and along the southern, northern and some other oceanic margins (positive or negative bias). The physical elements responsible for these errors include wind, temperature, and coastal terrain and so on. Errors in the southern oceans are due to the bias in an SSS retrieval algorithm caused by the coexisting high wind speed and low temperature; errors along the oceanic margins are due to the bias in a brightness temperature (TB) reconstruction caused by the high contrast between L-band emissivities fromice or land and from ocean; in addition, some other systematic errors are due to the bias in TB observation caused by a radio frequency interference and a radiometer receivers drift, etc. The findings will contribute to the scientific correction and appropriate application of the SMOS SSS products.

Key words

soil moisture and ocean salinity SMOS remotely sensed sea surface salinity error analysis 

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Copyright information

© The Chinese Society of Oceanography and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jian Chen
    • 1
  • Ren Zhang
    • 1
  • Huizan Wang
    • 1
  • Yuzhu An
    • 1
  • Luhua Wang
    • 1
  • Gongjie Wang
    • 1
  1. 1.PLA Key Laboratory of Marine Environment, Institute of Meteorology and OceanographyPLA University of Science and TechnologyNanjingChina

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