Advertisement

Acta Oceanologica Sinica

, Volume 29, Issue 1, pp 42–51 | Cite as

Assessment of the conventional molybdenum-blue and magnesium-induced coprecipitation procedures in phosphorus measurement in various aquatic environments

  • Sumei LiuEmail author
  • Yingfei Zhao
  • Jingling Ren
  • Jing Zhang
  • San Sun
  • Jie Jin
  • Guiling Zhang
Article

Abstract

Phosphorus (P) is an essential nutrient utilized by all organisms for energy transport and growth. Both the conventional molybdenum-blue method and the magnesium-induced coprecipitation (MAGIC) procedures were applied for the measurement of dissolved inorganic phosphorus (DIP) and total dissolved phosphorus (TDP) in more than 840 water samples collected between 2003 and 2005, including seawater (the Huanghai Sea, the East China Sea, and the northern South China Sea), water from rivers and estuaries (the Changjiang, the Huanghe, and the major rivers emptying into the Jiaozhou Bay), groundwater (in the drainage basin surrounding the Jiaozhou Bay), rainwater, and aquaculture water samples. The MAGIC method allows the investigation of phosphorus distributions and cycling for systems in which DIP is below the detection limits of conventional methods. Comparison between the two methods demonstrated that the concentrations obtained with both methods were significantly correlated. The differences of DIP and TDP concentrations measured with the two methods were higher when the concentrations of DIP and TDP were lower, implying the lower reproducibility at low concentrations. The concentration differences increase with the increase in the proportion of DOP in TDP, which indicates that the discrepancy of DIP concentrations measured with the two methods increases when the DOP concentration is high. The discrepancies indicated that the composition of P compounds differs depending on sample sources and water type; it would be useful to infer the presence of different phosphorus compound pools from differences between the two methods. This study indicates the potential presence of a pool of alkaline-labile compounds for samples from rainwater and rivers and estuaries surrounding the Jiaozhou Bay; the potential presence of acid-labile compounds that were adsorbed by Mg(OH)2 for samples from the Changjiang Estuary, Huanghai Sea, East China Sea, and groundwater; the potential presence of a substantial pool of acid-labile compounds that were not adsorbed by Mg(OH)2 for samples from the Huanghe Estuary, aquaculture water, the East China Sea algal bloom water, and the northern South China Sea.

Key words

phosphorus magnesium-induced coprecipitation conventional blue phosphomolybic acid assay various aquatic environments 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Cheng Yan, Ren Jingling, Li Dandan, et al. 2006. Distribution of arsenic and its seasonal variations in the coastal area adjacent to the Changjiang Estuary. Journal of Ocean University, 5(3): 243–250CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Cotner J B, Ammerman J W, Peele E R, et al. 1997. Phosphorus-limited bacterioplankton growth in the Sargasso Sea. Aquatic Microbial Ecology, 13: 141–149CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Elbaz-Poulichet F, Huang W W, Martin J M, et al. 1990. Behavior of dissolved trace elements in the Changjiang Estuary. In: Yu Guohui, Martin J M, Zhou J Y, eds. Biogeochemical Study of the Changjiang Estuary. Beijing: China Ocean Press, 293–311Google Scholar
  4. Grasshoff K, Kremling K, Ehrhardt M. 1999. Methods of Seawater Analysis. 3rd ed. Weinheim; New York; Chiester; Brisbane; Singapore; Toronto: WILEY-VCH, 159–228Google Scholar
  5. Johnson D L. 1971. Simultaneous determination of arsenate and phosphate in natural waters. Environmental Science and Technology, 5: 411–414CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Karl D M, Letelier R, Tupas L, et al. 1997. The role of nitrogen fixation in biochemical cycling in the subtropical North Pacific Ocean. Nature, 388: 53–538CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Karl D M, Tien G. 1992. MAGIC: A sensitive and precise method for measuring dissolved phosphorus in aquatic environments. Limnollogy and Oceanography, 37(1): 105–116Google Scholar
  8. Liu Sumei, Tréguer P, Beucher C, et al. 2008. A study on the rate of production and dissolution of biosilica, Jiaozhou Bay as an example. Journal of Ocean University of China (in Chinese), 38(5): 781–790Google Scholar
  9. Liu Sumei, Zhang Jing, Chen Hongtao, et al. 2005. Factors influencing nutrient dynamics in the eutrophic Jiaozhou Bay, North China. Progress in Oceanography, 66: 66–85CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Liu Sumei, Zhao Yingfei, Zhang Jing, et al. 2006. Application of magnesium induced coprecipitation procedure in frequent harmful algal bloom areas of the East China Sea. Journal of Ocean University of China (in Chinese), 36(5): 836–840Google Scholar
  11. Ren Jingling, Li Dandan, Zhang Jing, et al. 2007. Speciation and distribution of dissolved inorganic arsenic in the Yellow Sea and East China Sea. Marine Environmental Science (in Chinese), 26: 211–216Google Scholar
  12. Ren Jingling, Zhang Jing, Li Dandan, et al. 2007. Speciation and seasonal variations of dissolved inorganic arsenic in Jiaozhou Bay, North China. Water, Air and Soil Pollution: Focus, 7: 655–671CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Rimmelin P, Moutin T. 2005. Re-examination of the MAGIC method to determine low orthophosphate concentration in seawater. Analytica Chimica Acta, 548: 174–182CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Thomson-Bulldis A, Karl D. 1998. Application of a novel method for phosphorus determination in the oligotrophic North Pacific Ocean. Limnology and Oceanography, 43(7): 1565–1577CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Valderrama J C. 1981. The simultaneous analysis of total nitrogen and total phosphorus in natural waters. Marine Chemistry, 10: 109–122CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Wu J, Sunda W, Boyle E A, et al. 2000. Phosphate depletion in the western North Atlantic Ocean. Science, 289: 759–762CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Zhang Jing. 1996. Geochemistry of arsenic in the Huanghe (Yellow River) and its delta region-A review of available data. Aquatic Geochemistry, 1: 241–275CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Zhang J, Martin J M, Thomas A J, et al. 1990. Fate of the particulate elements in the Changjiang Estuary and the East China Sea. In: Yu Guohui, Martin J M, Zhou J Y, eds. Biogeochemical Study of the Changjiang Estuary. Beijing: China Ocean Press, 220–244Google Scholar
  19. Zhang Jing, Su Jilan. 2006. Nutrient dynamics of Chinese seas: The Bohai Sea, Yellow Sea, East China Sea and South China Sea. In: Robinson A R, Brink K H, eds. The Sea, 14: 637–671Google Scholar
  20. Zhang Guosen, Zhang Jing, Liu Sumei. 2007. Characterization of nutrients in the atmospheric wet and dry deposition observed at the two monitoring sites over Yellow Sea and East China Sea. Journal of Atmospheric Chemistry, 57: 41–57CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© The Chinese Society of Oceanography and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sumei Liu
    • 1
    Email author
  • Yingfei Zhao
    • 1
  • Jingling Ren
    • 1
  • Jing Zhang
    • 1
    • 2
  • San Sun
    • 1
  • Jie Jin
    • 1
  • Guiling Zhang
    • 1
  1. 1.Key Laboratory of Marine Chemistry Theory and Technology Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry and Chemical EngineeringOcean University of QingdaoQingdaoChina
  2. 2.State Key Laboratory of Estuarine and Coastal ResearchEast China Normal UniversityShanghaiChina

Personalised recommendations