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Systematic Review of In Vivo Animal Models of Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Species, Standard Parameters, and Outcomes

  • Serge Marbacher
  • Basil Grüter
  • Salome Schöpf
  • Davide Croci
  • Edin Nevzati
  • Donato D’Alonzo
  • Jacqueline Lattmann
  • Tabitha Roth
  • Benjamin Bircher
  • Christina Wolfert
  • Carl Muroi
  • Gilles Dutilh
  • Hans Rudolf Widmer
  • Javier Fandino
Review Article
  • 109 Downloads

Abstract

In preclinical models, modification of experimental parameters associated with techniques of inducing subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) can greatly affect outcomes. To analyze how parameter choice affects the relevance and comparability of findings, we systematically reviewed 765 experimental studies of in vivo animal SAH models (2000–2014). During the last decade, we found marked increases in publications using smaller species and models for simulating acute events after SAH. Overall, the fewer types of species and models used did not correlate with an increased standardization in the experimental characteristics and procedures. However, by species, commonly applied, reliable parameters for each experimental SAH technique were identified in mouse, rat, rabbit, and dog models. Our findings can serve as a starting point for discussion toward a more uniform performance of SAH experiments, development of preclinical SAH common data elements, and establishment of standardized protocols for multicenter preclinical trials.

Keywords

Subarachnoid hemorrhage Animal Model Delayed cerebral vasospasm Early brain injury 

Notes

Acknowledgements

We thank our secretaries and assistants (Department of Neurosurgery, Kantonsspital Aarau, Switzerland) for obtaining more than 1000 articles for review. We are grateful to Sarah McCann (CAMARADES Methodologist, Centre for Clinical Brain Sciences, University of Edinburgh, UK) who supported our data management and data extraction. We thank Mary Kemper (Glia Media) for medical editing.

Author Contributions

Conception and design: Marbacher, Schöpf. Screening of titles and abstracts: Marbacher, Muroi. Full-text data extraction: Grüter, Schöpf, Croci, Lattmann, Roth, Bircher, and Wolfert. Analysis and interpretation of data: Marbacher, Dutilh. Drafting the article: Marbacher, Grüter, Dutilh. Critically revising the article: Nevzati, Widmer. Statistical analysis: Dutilh. Administrative support: Fandino. Study supervision: Fandino.

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of Interest

The authors declare that there is no conflict of interest.

Supplementary material

12975_2018_657_MOESM1_ESM.pdf (616 kb)
ESM 1 (PDF 616 kb)

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Serge Marbacher
    • 1
    • 2
  • Basil Grüter
    • 1
    • 2
  • Salome Schöpf
    • 1
    • 2
  • Davide Croci
    • 1
    • 2
  • Edin Nevzati
    • 1
    • 2
  • Donato D’Alonzo
    • 1
  • Jacqueline Lattmann
    • 1
  • Tabitha Roth
    • 1
  • Benjamin Bircher
    • 1
  • Christina Wolfert
    • 1
  • Carl Muroi
    • 1
    • 2
  • Gilles Dutilh
    • 3
  • Hans Rudolf Widmer
    • 4
  • Javier Fandino
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Neurosurgery c/o Neuro Research OfficeKantonsspital AarauAarauSwitzerland
  2. 2.Cerebrovascular Research Group, Department for BioMedical ResearchUniversity of BernBernSwitzerland
  3. 3.Department of Clinical Research, Clinical Trial UnitUniversity of Basel HospitalBaselSwitzerland
  4. 4.Department of NeurosurgeryUniversity Hospital BernBernSwitzerland

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