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Digital zoom is a useful, simple, and cost-effective method of reducing radiation exposure in percutaneous coronary intervention

  • Kenji Hasegawa
  • Norio UmemotoEmail author
  • Sho Inoue
  • Yuri Iio
  • Naoki Shibata
  • Takashi Mizutani
  • Akinori Sawamura
  • Tsuyoshi Sugiura
  • Toshio Taniguchi
  • Toru Asai
  • Michiharu Yamada
  • Hideki Ishii
  • Toyoaki Murohara
  • Kiyokazu Shimizu
Original Article
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Abstract

Reducing radiation exposure is a very important issue in interventional cardiology techniques such as percutaneous coronary intervention. Although novel techniques to reduce radiation exposure are valuable, we should also reconsider older techniques. Digital zoom has been available in Japan from 2005. Digital zoom enlarges an 8-inch field of view (FOV) by 1.2 times, allowing visualization of a 6.7-inch FOV without FOV switching. We identified 2101 suitable cases of percutaneous intervention (PCI) and divided them into two groups according to the use of digital zoom; 1195 patients were included in the digital zoom group and 906 patients in the conventional group. We collected data regarding the reference air kerma (RAK) and dose-area product (DAP). We calculated RAK and DAP per minute fluoroscope time (RAK/min, DAP/min, respectively). There were intergroup differences in RAK, DAP, RAK/min, and DAP/min (digital zoom group vs conventional group; RAK, 1590 mGy [990–2410] vs 1850 [1220–2720], p < 0.01, RAK/min; 54.7 mGy/min [38.5–73.2] vs 71.2 [51.5–93.0], p < 0.01; DAP, 16,000 cGy × cm2 [10,300–24,400] vs 20,700 [13,400–29,500], p < 0.001; DAP/min, 557 cGy × cm2/min [392–737] vs 782 [571–1010], p < 0.01, respectively). Because of baseline differences between the two groups, we performed propensity score matching. Even after score matching, there were intergroup differences in DAP, DAP/min, RAK, and RAK/min. Furthermore, the least squares method showed that digital zoom is a significant predictor of RAK (β = 0.14, p < 0.01) and DAP (β = 0.20, p < 0.01). Digital zoom is an older cost-effective technique that can significantly reduce radiation exposure in PCI.

Keywords

Digital zoom Coronary intervention Radiation dose reduction Dose-area product Reference air-kerma 

Notes

Acknowledgements

I am grateful to Shigenobu Seguchi for collaboration on the early stages of this work.

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors have no conflicts of interest to declare.

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Copyright information

© Japanese Association of Cardiovascular Intervention and Therapeutics 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kenji Hasegawa
    • 1
  • Norio Umemoto
    • 2
    Email author
  • Sho Inoue
    • 2
  • Yuri Iio
    • 2
  • Naoki Shibata
    • 2
  • Takashi Mizutani
    • 2
  • Akinori Sawamura
    • 1
    • 3
  • Tsuyoshi Sugiura
    • 2
  • Toshio Taniguchi
    • 2
  • Toru Asai
    • 2
  • Michiharu Yamada
    • 2
  • Hideki Ishii
    • 3
  • Toyoaki Murohara
    • 3
  • Kiyokazu Shimizu
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of RadiologyIchinomiya Municipal HospitalIchinomiyaJapan
  2. 2.Department of Cardiology, Cardiovascular CenterIchinomiya Municipal HospitalIchinomiyaJapan
  3. 3.Department of CardiologyNagoya University Graduate School of MedicineNagoyaJapan

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