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Transcatheter pharmacomechanical approach for acute renal vein thrombosis: a rational technique

  • Budunur C. Srinivas
  • Bhupinder SinghEmail author
  • Sanjay Srinivasa
  • Shashikumar S. Reddy
  • Nagesh C. Mahadevappa
  • Babu Reddy
Case Report

Abstract

Acute renal vein thrombosis (RVT) causes rapid deterioration of renal function if it is not treated aggressively. Conventional anticoagulation therapy is the standard mode of treatment; however, the need for rapid and complete resolution has led to the development of newer modes of treatment such as percutaneous catheter-directed techniques. We describe a case of acute RVT with deteriorating renal functions that highlights the rational of percutaneous catheter-directed combined pharmacomechanical thrombolysis-thrombectomy approach to successfully restore the renal vein patency with improvement of the renal function.

Keywords

Renal vein thrombosis Transcatheter treatment Pharmacomechanical approach 

Notes

Conflict of interest

None.

Supplementary material

Supplementary material 1 (AVI 374 kb)

Supplementary material 2 (AVI 217 kb)

Supplementary material 3 (AVI 1772 kb)

Supplementary material 4 (AVI 1274 kb)

Supplementary material 5 (AVI 2523 kb)

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Copyright information

© Japanese Association of Cardiovascular Intervention and Therapeutics 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Budunur C. Srinivas
    • 1
  • Bhupinder Singh
    • 1
    Email author
  • Sanjay Srinivasa
    • 2
  • Shashikumar S. Reddy
    • 3
  • Nagesh C. Mahadevappa
    • 1
  • Babu Reddy
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of CardiologySri Jayadeva Institute of Cardiovascular Sciences and ResearchBangaloreIndia
  2. 2.Department of NephrologySuguna HospitalBangaloreIndia
  3. 3.Department of RadiologySuguna HospitalBangaloreIndia

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