Journal of Crop Science and Biotechnology

, Volume 21, Issue 1, pp 57–65 | Cite as

Changes in the Functional Components and Radical Scavenging Activity of Korean Maize Hybrids According to Different Cropping Seasons

  • Hyun-Joo Kim
  • Mi Jung Kim
  • Eun-Yeong Sim
  • Choon Ki Lee
  • Yong Hee Jeon
  • Sun Lim Kim
  • Gun-Ho Jung
  • Beom-Young Son
  • Koan Sik Woo
Research Article
  • 22 Downloads

Abstract

We evaluated the proximate composition, free sugar content, fatty acid composition, carotenoid content, total phenol content, and radical scavenging activity of the grain from various Korean maize hybrid cultivars grown in two different cropping seasons. The moisture, crude ash, crude fat, crude protein, total starch, and amylose contents were significantly higher in most of the maize hybrid cultivars when grown in the early-season than when grown in the late-season. The free sugar content, fatty acid composition, carotenoid content, and total phenol content differed significantly between cultivars and cropping seasons. The highest unsaturated fatty acid compositions of maize hybrids of early-season and late-season were 86.05 and 86.29%, respectively, in the Daanok cultivar. The carotenoid contents were significantly higher in maize hybrids of late-season compared to those of early-season. The highest total phenol content was 108.09 mg/100 g in Singwangok of the late-season. The radical scavenging activity of maize hybrids differed significantly between cultivars and cropping seasons.

Key words

Maize (Zea mays L.) cultivation period carotenoid radical scavenging activity 

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Copyright information

© Korean Society of Crop Science and Springer Science+Business Media B.V., part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hyun-Joo Kim
    • 1
  • Mi Jung Kim
    • 1
  • Eun-Yeong Sim
    • 1
  • Choon Ki Lee
    • 1
  • Yong Hee Jeon
    • 1
  • Sun Lim Kim
    • 1
  • Gun-Ho Jung
    • 1
  • Beom-Young Son
    • 1
  • Koan Sik Woo
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Central Area Crop Science, National Institute of Crop ScienceRural Development AdministrationSuwon, GyeonggiRepublic of Korea

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